Mothers

Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVES: To determine what evidence exists to support the practice of viewing the deceased fetus by women terminating pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases searched (1966-2007) were Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts Index. STUDY SELECTION: Literature was reviewed that either directly or parenthetically dealt with the emotional effects on women of viewing the fetus post termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA EXTRACTION: No randomized or controlled trials were found.

Author(s): 
Sloan, Eileen P.
Kirsh, Sharon
Mowbray, Mary
Publication Title: 
Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology

Evidence-based practice and patient-centered practice are not mutually exclusive clinical ideals. Instead, both styles hold tremendous potential for complementarity in healthcare and should be used to enhance clinical relationships in which caring is humble, mindful, and nuanced. The onus of the responsibility for many decisions about care after stillbirth falls on clinical staff. Yet, even in the dearth of literature exploring standards of care during stillbirth the results can be conflicting.

Author(s): 
Cacciatore, Joanne
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

We previously reported that psychological stress is linked to and possibly accelerates cellular aging, as reflected by lower PBMC telomerase and shortened telomeres. Psychological stress is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), with multiple behavioral and physiological mediators. Telomere shortness has been associated with CVD, but the relationship between low telomerase activity, a potential precursor to telomere shortening, and CVD risk factors has not been examined in humans.

Author(s): 
Epel, Elissa S.
Lin, Jue
Wilhelm, Frank H.
Wolkowitz, Owen M.
Cawthon, Richard
Adler, Nancy E.
Dolbier, Christyn
Mendes, Wendy B.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Numerous studies demonstrate links between chronic stress and indices of poor health, including risk factors for cardiovascular disease and poorer immune function. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms of how stress gets "under the skin" remain elusive. We investigated the hypothesis that stress impacts health by modulating the rate of cellular aging.

Author(s): 
Epel, Elissa S.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Lin, Jue
Dhabhar, Firdaus S.
Adler, Nancy E.
Morrow, Jason D.
Cawthon, Richard M.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is a predictor of age-related disease onset and mortality. The association in adults of psychosocial stress or stress biomarkers with LTL suggests telomere biology may represent a possible underlying mechanism linking stress and health outcomes. It is, however, unknown whether stress exposure in intrauterine life can produce variations in LTL, thereby potentially setting up a long-term trajectory for disease susceptibility.

Author(s): 
Entringer, Sonja
Epel, Elissa S.
Kumsta, Robert
Lin, Jue
Hellhammer, Dirk H.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
W¸st, Stefan
Wadhwa, Pathik D.
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

We previously reported that psychological stress is linked to and possibly accelerates cellular aging, as reflected by lower PBMC telomerase and shortened telomeres. Psychological stress is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), with multiple behavioral and physiological mediators. Telomere shortness has been associated with CVD, but the relationship between low telomerase activity, a potential precursor to telomere shortening, and CVD risk factors has not been examined in humans.

Author(s): 
Epel, Elissa S.
Lin, Jue
Wilhelm, Frank H.
Wolkowitz, Owen M.
Cawthon, Richard
Adler, Nancy E.
Dolbier, Christyn
Mendes, Wendy B.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is a predictor of age-related disease onset and mortality. The association in adults of psychosocial stress or stress biomarkers with LTL suggests telomere biology may represent a possible underlying mechanism linking stress and health outcomes. It is, however, unknown whether stress exposure in intrauterine life can produce variations in LTL, thereby potentially setting up a long-term trajectory for disease susceptibility.

Author(s): 
Entringer, Sonja
Epel, Elissa S.
Kumsta, Robert
Lin, Jue
Hellhammer, Dirk H.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
W¸st, Stefan
Wadhwa, Pathik D.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry Research

The goal of the present study was to investigate parent-of-origin effects in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Parent-of-origin effects in ADHD may be due to differences in the relative quantity of risk factors transmitted by each parent. Alternatively, parent-of-origin effects may be produced by qualitative differences in the risks transmitted, such as those carried on the sex chromosomes or regulated by genomic imprinting.

Author(s): 
Goos, Lisa M.
Ezzatian, Payam
Schachar, Russell
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

Intergenerational effects of trauma have been observed clinically in a wide range of populations, and parental PTSD has been associated with an increased risk for psychopathology in offspring. In studies of Holocaust survivor offspring, parental PTSD, and particularly maternal PTSD, has been associated with increased risk for PTSD, low basal urinary cortisol excretion and enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone.

Author(s): 
Lehrner, Amy
Bierer, Linda M.
Passarelli, Vincent
Pratchett, Laura C.
Flory, Janine D.
Bader, Heather N.
Harris, Iris R.
Bedi, Aarti
Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.
Makotkine, Iouri
Yehuda, Rachel
Publication Title: 
The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry: The Official Journal of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry

OBJECTIVES: Transmission of parental post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to offspring might be explained by transmission of epigenetic processes such as methylation status of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene (NR3C1).

Author(s): 
Perroud, Nader
Rutembesa, Eugene
Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane
Mutabaruka, Jean
Mutesa, LÈon
Stenz, Ludwig
Malafosse, Alain
Karege, FÈlicien

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