Motion Pictures as Topic

Publication Title: 
Archives of Sexual Behavior

The expression of sexuality in best-selling novels and major motion pictures was examined. There are two reasons that such stimuli merit systematic analysis. First and foremost is the finding that best-selling novels and major motion pictures exist as a primary source of sexual information. Of equal importance, however, is the need to examine such stimuli for myths and fallacies. The novels and films analyzed in the present study were selected from the last years of three consecutive decades: 1959, 1969, and 1979.

Author(s): 
Abramson, P. R.
Mechanic, M. B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

The last five decades of the American cinema have produced a remarkably consistent stereotype of the female analyst. In films such as Spellbound (1945), Knock on Wood (1954), Sex and the Single Girl (1964), They Might be Giants (1971), and The Man Who Loved Women (1983), women analysts are swept away by countertransference love that leads them to become sexually or romantically involved with their male patients.

Author(s): 
Gabbard, G. O.
Gabbard, K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Homosexuality

Asserting that gay male identity exists in the unstable frontier between culturally-defined notions of femininity and masculinity, this paper makes a close reading of the recent film Apartment Zero. This reading highlights the paradoxically aggressive and loving contest over the signs or trophies of masculinity--ranging from a soldier's cape to the phallus itself--which characterizes both homosocial and homosexual relations among men.

Author(s): 
Joselit, D.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic

The medium of film offers a vivid demonstration of the ongoing tension between conventional morality and mature, passionate love. While film activates mass psychology and therefore conventionality, the erotic in film threatens conventional boundaries. The dialectic thus involved in erotic art in film, the conventional film, and pornography sheds light on the unconscious motivations for accepting or rejecting the erotic.

Author(s): 
Kernberg, O. F.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

Hans Christian Andersen's story 'The Little Mermaid' is read as a creation myth and a metaphor for woman's condition in patriarchy, broadly conceptualised within a Lacanian framework. In the first part, the psychoanalytic concept of castration (broadly conceptualised as containing any existential severance which forms the basis for sexual difference and subjectivity) is utilised to argue that the myth is about a construction of (mostly female) subjectivity through a series of separations or splits: (1) birth, (2) growing up, (3) desire and (4) death.

Author(s): 
TseÎlon, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

The psychological world of The English Patient is explored to deepen the understanding of schizoid states. The protagonist, Alm·sy, is a remote desert explorer whose triangular sadomasochistic affair with the married Katharine destroys them all. His damaged skin is understood as a symbolic representation of his psychological condition. For the schizoid, love consumes and leads to obliteration of the self, represented by the loss of identifying features, and to traumatic permeability (i.e., the loss of boundaries between self and other, and between the ego and repressed desires).

Author(s): 
Doidge, N.
Publication Title: 
The Aging Male: The Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male

In popular feature films of the 20th century, the aging male is generally presented as a kindly, if feeble, old grandfather or as a ruthless villain. A handful of films from this era broke with tradition and took the bold step of exploring the social and medical implications of latent sexual impulses in this age group. Love for aging males was typically presented as a dangerous aberration that held the promise of tragic consequences. This paper will demonstrate that cinematographic presentations of geriatric male sexuality faithfully adhere to the medical dogma of the day.

Author(s): 
Hodges, F. M.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Psychoanalysis

This paper explores the issue of how character is created and re-created in the context of relationships. This theme, salient in the recent film The Hours, has been particularly problematic for creative women, who are often caught in tensions between self-development and relationship. Two case examples are given, in counterpoint to the film and to illustrations from Woolf's life and work. Through these various lenses, we can consider the complex interplays between our conjectures as to the expected price of relationship, and the actual price exacted as our various dramas unfold.

Author(s): 
Charles, Marilyn
Publication Title: 
Journal of Homosexuality

A symptomatic representation, from a Marxist critical vantage point, of three prototypical recent U.S. and U.K. films of young gay romance-Beautiful Thing, Get Real, and Edge of Seventeen-shows these films (as well as the larger, insurgent cinematic subgenre of which they serve as particularly exemplary instances) do significant ideological work, contrary to what might appear to be the case from a superficial (and uncritical) reading that dismisses them as pure escapism. These films confront contradictions central to contemporary U.S. and U.K.

Author(s): 
Nowlan, Bob
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

Using different psychoanalytic points of view, in this comparative study of "Traumnovelle" by Schnitzler and "Eyes Wide Shut" by Kubrick the author analyses the cultural changes between the first and last thirds of the 20th century. This change consists in the way "facts of life" are dealt with. It is a change from identity through insight and understanding to an identity through excited self-objectification.

Author(s): 
Danckwardt, Joachim F.

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