Movement Disorders

Publication Title: 
Neurotherapeutics: The Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics

Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders are a common source of disability and distress. Despite this, little systematic evidence is available to guide treatment decisions. This situation is likely to have been influenced by the "no man's land" that such patients occupy between neurologists and psychiatrists, often with neither side feeling a clear responsibility or ability to direct management. The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current state of the evidence regarding management of functional movement disorders.

Author(s): 
Ricciardi, Luciana
Edwards, Mark J.
Publication Title: 
Revue Neurologique

INTRODUCTION: Hypnosis might represent an interesting complementary therapeutic approach to movement disorders, as it takes into account not only symptoms, but also well-being, and empowers patients to take a more active role in their treatment. METHODS: Our review of the literature on the use of hypnosis to treat movement disorders was done by systematically searching the PubMed database for reports published between 1984 and November 2015.

Author(s): 
Flamand-Roze, C.
Célestin-Lhopiteau, I.
Roze, E.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Clinical Practice

OBJECTIVES: We determined the prevalence, range and factors influencing the use of complementary therapy among hemifacial spasm patients and compared the patterns of use of complementary therapies across different movement disorders in a systematic pooled analysis of published literature. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was administered to 96 hemifacial spasm patients evaluating frequency of complementary therapy use, and factors influencing patients' decision to seek these therapies.

Author(s): 
Peeraully, T.
Hameed, S.
Cheong, P. T.
Pavanni, R.
Hussein, K.
Fook-Chong, S. M. C.
Tan, E.-K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurogenetics

Mutation of the human gene superoxide dismutase (hSOD1) triggers the fatal neurodegenerative motorneuron disorder, familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). Broad expression of this gene in Drosophila has no effect on longevity or functional senescence. We show here that restricting expression of human SOD1 primarily to motorneurons of Drosophila has significant effects on optomotor efficiency during in-flight tracking of rapidly moving visual targets.

Author(s): 
Petrosyan, Agavni
GonÁalves, Oscar F.
Hsieh, I.-Hui
Phillips, John P.
Saberi, Kourosh
Publication Title: 
Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine. Supplement

Step duration, measured in hemiparetic patients walking on a circular path, showed that step duration of the affected foot is usually longer. Functional electrical stimulation of the peroneal nerve in the swing phase of the step (eliminating foot drop) shortened step duration in the majority of cases.

Author(s): 
Radil, T.
Snýdrová, I.
Há?ik, L.
Pfeiffer, J.
Votava, J.
Publication Title: 
Sleep

The following describes a case of rhythmic movement disorder successfully treated with hypnosis. Hypnosis and its use in sleep disorders are discussed, and it is hypothesized that hypnosis is an effective intervention in disorders that occur at the interface between waking and sleep.

Author(s): 
Rosenberg, C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna, Austria: 1996)

Georges Albert Edouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette (1857-1904), a French neurologist and pupil of Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière hospital in Paris, has gained common recognition through his description of the 'Maladie des Tics'. This complex neuropsychiatric disorder, later known as the 'Tourette's syndrome', nowadays is accepted as a specific entity of movement disorders. Gilles had started working under Charcot (1825-1893), the first physician to occupy a designated chair of neurology of neuropsychiatric history, in 1884.

Author(s): 
Krämer, H.
Daniels, C.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Neurology

Patients with PNMDs pose a fascinating challenge to clinicians at the neurology-psychiatry interface. We have outlined a diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these complex disorders. Patients with PNMDs typically manifest abnormal movements and postures that do not fit expected patterns of movement disorder phenomenology. The first goal of neurologic consultation is to make an accurate diagnosis, with a view to either ruling out or defining the extent of any organic substrate.

Author(s): 
Williams, Daniel T.
Ford, Blair
Fahn, Stanley
Publication Title: 
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were (1) to demonstrate the reliability and validity of the Impact of Weight on Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (IWADL), a measure of ability to perform daily physical activities, in individuals with type 2 diabetes who are moderately obese and (2) to characterize those individuals with low self-reported ability. METHODS: Data from a web-based survey of individuals with type 2 diabetes and body mass index (BMI) of 30-40?k/mg(2) were used to calculate Cronbach's ? and demonstrate both IWADL factorial and construct validity.

Author(s): 
Hayes, Risa P.
Nelson, David R.
Meldahl, Michael L.
Curtis, Bradley H.
Publication Title: 
Neurotherapeutics: The Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics

Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders are a common source of disability and distress. Despite this, little systematic evidence is available to guide treatment decisions. This situation is likely to have been influenced by the "no man's land" that such patients occupy between neurologists and psychiatrists, often with neither side feeling a clear responsibility or ability to direct management. The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current state of the evidence regarding management of functional movement disorders.

Author(s): 
Ricciardi, Luciana
Edwards, Mark J.

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