Muscle Relaxation

Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

Hand and computer searches located studies on the effects of relaxation techniques on trait anxiety. Effect sizes for the different treatments (e.g., Progressive Relaxation, EMG Biofeedback, various forms of meditation, etc.) were calculated. Most of the treatments produced similar effect sizes except that Transcendental Meditation had significantly larger effect size (p less than .005), and meditation that involved concentration had significantly smaller effect.

Author(s): 
Eppley, K. R.
Abrams, A. I.
Shear, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Behavioral Medicine

This article reviews controlled trials of hypnotic treatment for chronic pain in terms of: (1) analyses comparing the effects of hypnotic treatment to six types of control conditions; (2) component analyses; and (3) predictor analyses. The findings indicate that hypnotic analgesia produces significantly greater decreases in pain relative to no-treatment and to some non-hypnotic interventions such as medication management, physical therapy, and education/advice.

Author(s): 
Jensen, Mark
Patterson, David R.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Hypnosis is regarded as an effective treatment for psychological and physical ailments. However, its efficacy as a strategy for managing chronic pain has not been assessed through meta-analytical methods. The objective of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of hypnosis for managing chronic pain. When compared with standard care, hypnosis provided moderate treatment benefit. Hypnosis also showed a moderate superior effect as compared to other psychological interventions for a nonheadache group.

Author(s): 
Adachi, Tomonori
Fujino, Haruo
Nakae, Aya
Mashimo, Takashi
Sasaki, Jun
Publication Title: 
Drugs Under Experimental and Clinical Research

Allergic rhinitis, also known as hay fever, rose fever or summer catarrh, is a major challenge to health professionals. A large number of the world's population, including approximately 40 million Americans, suffers from allergic rhinitis. A novel, botanical formulation (Aller-7) has been developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis using a combination of extracts from seven medicinal plants, including Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, T. bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale and P. longum, which have a proven history of efficacy and health benefits.

Author(s): 
Amit, A.
Saxena, V. S.
Pratibha, N.
D'Souza, P.
Bagchi, M.
Bagchi, D.
Stohs, S. J.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician
Author(s): 
Stone, P.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Ss were monitored for respiratory rate, pulse rate, blood pressure, skin resistance, EEG activity, and muscle activity. They were monitored during the alert state, meditation (TM or simple word type), hypnosis (relaxation and task types), and relaxation. Ss gave a verbal comparative evaluation of each state. The results showed significantly better relaxation responses for the relaxation states (relaxation, relaxation-hypnosis, meditation) than for the alert state.

Author(s): 
Morse, D. R.
Martin, J. S.
Furst, M. L.
Dubin, L. L.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Society of Psychosomatic Dentistry and Medicine
Author(s): 
Wollman, L.
Publication Title: 
J?sai Shika Daigaku Kiy?. The Bulletin of the Josai Dental University
Author(s): 
Tani, N.
Sasaki, H.
Koike, I.
Yamamoto, A.
Fukano, E.
Yagiyu, Y.
Yamamoto, Y.

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