Muscle, Skeletal

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the homeopathic medicine Arnica D30 has an effect on muscle soreness and cell damage after marathon running. METHODS: The subjects were 82 marathon runners from two separate randomised double-blind placebo controlled trials participating in the Oslo Marathon in 1990 and 1995. Five pills of Arnica D30 or placebo were given morning and evening. Treatment started on the evening before the marathon and continued on day of the race and the three following days. The runners assessed muscular soreness on a visual analogue scale.

Author(s): 
Tveiten, D.
Bruset, S.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine

OBJECTIVE: Physical interventions (nonpharmacological and nonsurgical) are the mainstay of treatment for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Physiotherapy is the most common of all physical interventions and includes specific vastus medialis obliquus or general quadriceps strengthening and/or realignment procedures (tape, brace, stretching). These treatments appear to be based on sound theoretical rationale and have attained widespread acceptance, but evidence for the efficacy of these interventions is not well established.

Author(s): 
Crossley, K.
Bennell, K.
Green, S.
McConnell, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of using acupuncture treatment for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) of muscular origin according to research published in the last decade. METHODS: The information was gathered using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CISCOM databases.

Author(s): 
La Touche, Roy
Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, Santiago
de-la-Hoz, Jose Luis
Fernández-Carnero, Josue
Ge, Hong-You
Linares, María Teresa
Mesa, Juan
Sánchez-Gutierrez, Jesús
Publication Title: 
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes: Official Journal, German Society of Endocrinology [and] German Diabetes Association

The aqueous extract of the fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. has been evaluated for its antidiabetic activity in streptozotocin (STZ) induced mild diabetic rats and compared with a known drug, tolbutamide. The oral effective dose (ED) of the extract was observed to be 200 mg/kg body weight, which produced a fall of 55.6% (p<0.01) in the oral glucose tolerance test.

Author(s): 
Murali, Y. K.
Anand, P.
Tandon, V.
Singh, R.
Chandra, R.
Murthy, P. S.
Publication Title: 
Meat Science

Conjugated linoleic acid, a fatty acid found in milk fat and ruminant meat is one of the functional food components. Modifying fatty acid composition so as to increase CLA and other beneficial PUFA/MUFA level and reducing SFA levels might be a key to enhance the neutraceutical and therapeutic value of ruminant-derived food products.

Author(s): 
Rana, Madhu Suman
Tyagi, A.
Hossain, Sk Asraf
Tyagi, A. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet

OBJECTIVE: Twenty one plants as ingredients of Thai traditional preparation called Sahasthara for relieve muscles pain and distal numbness were studied for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The extracts were obtained by maceration with 95% ethanol. They were tested for their antioxidant activity by DPPH scavenging assay and anti-inflammatory activity by determination of inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 cell lines using Griess reagent.

Author(s): 
Kakatum, Narin
Jaiarree, Nuanjan
Makchucit, Sunita
Itharat, Arunporn
Publication Title: 
Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the processing time and neuromuscular delay required to extract and process sensory information from the ankle in order to coordinate an upper extremity movement sequence. METHODS: Nineteen able-bodied subjects were tested on their ability to perform a motor task that involved extension of their left index finger when their left ankle was passively plantar flexed at random velocities through a predetermined target angle. RESULTS: We found that the able-bodied subjects were able to adjust their finger responses up to ankle velocities of 70 degrees /s (300 ms).

Author(s): 
Shields, Richard K.
Madhavan, Sangeetha
Cole, Keith R.
Brostad, Jared D.
Demeulenaere, Jeanne L.
Eggers, Christopher D.
Otten, Patrick H.
Publication Title: 
Human Molecular Genetics

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by loss of functional survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1), resulting in death of spinal motor neurons. Current therapeutic research focuses on modulating the expression of a partially functioning copy gene, SMN2, which is retained in SMA patients. However, a treatment strategy that improves the SMA phenotype by slowing or reversing the skeletal muscle atrophy may also be beneficial. Myostatin, a member of the TGF-beta super-family, is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass.

Author(s): 
Rose, Ferrill F.
Mattis, Virginia B.
Rindt, Hansjˆrg
Lorson, Christian L.
Publication Title: 
European journal of human genetics: EJHG

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of early childhood death worldwide and no therapy is available today. Many drugs, especially histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), increase SMN levels. As all HDACi tested so far only mildly ameliorate the SMA phenotype or are unsuitable for use in humans, there is still need to identify more potent drugs. Here, we assessed the therapeutic power of the pan-HDACi JNJ-26481585 for SMA, which is currently used in various clinical cancer trials.

Author(s): 
Schreml, Julia
Riessland, Markus
Paterno, Mario
Garbes, Lutz
Roflbach, Kristina
Ackermann, Bastian
Kr‰mer, Jan
Somers, Eilidh
Parson, Simon H.
Heller, Raoul
Berkessel, Albrecht
Sterner-Kock, Anja
Wirth, Brunhilde
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

Understanding mechanisms underlying longevity, and endeavor towards the specific goals of alleviating frailty in old age, require a comprehensive approach that considers the various theoretical and experimental approaches, as well as compiling the data on humans. This logistic has underlined the program of the conference, and is reflected in the present special issue. Considerable volume of data now point to distinct genes that are associated with exceptional longevity in humans, as reflected from the articles in this volume.

Author(s): 
Globerson, Amiela
Barzilai, Nir

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Muscle, Skeletal