Myofascial Pain Syndromes

Publication Title: 
European Journal of Pain (London, England)

Pain from myofascial trigger points is often treated by needling, with or without injection, although evidence is inconclusive on whether this is effective. We aimed to review the current evidence on needling without injection, by conducting a systematic literature review.

Author(s): 
Tough, Elizabeth A.
White, Adrian R.
Cummings, T. Michael
Richards, Suzanne H.
Campbell, John L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: A 1977 study by Melzack et al. reported 100% anatomic and 71% clinical pain correspondences of myofascial trigger points and classical acupuncture points in the treatment of pain disorders. A reanalysis of this study's data using different acupuncture resources by Birch a quarter century later concluded that correlating trigger points to classical acupuncture points was not conceptually possible and that the only class of acupuncture points that could were the a shi points. Moreover, Birch concluded that no more than 40% of the acupuncture points examined by Melzack et al.

Author(s): 
Dorsher, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVES: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are important aspects of musculoskeletal medicine, including chiropractic. The purpose of this study was to review the most commonly used treatment procedures in chiropractic for MPS and MTrPs. METHODS: The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care. This article is the outcome of this charge.

Author(s): 
Vernon, Howard
Schneider, Michael
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Pain (London, England)

Pain from myofascial trigger points is often treated by needling, with or without injection, although evidence is inconclusive on whether this is effective. We aimed to review the current evidence on needling without injection, by conducting a systematic literature review.

Author(s): 
Tough, Elizabeth A.
White, Adrian R.
Cummings, T. Michael
Richards, Suzanne H.
Campbell, John L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: A 1977 study by Melzack et al. reported 100% anatomic and 71% clinical pain correspondences of myofascial trigger points and classical acupuncture points in the treatment of pain disorders. A reanalysis of this study's data using different acupuncture resources by Birch a quarter century later concluded that correlating trigger points to classical acupuncture points was not conceptually possible and that the only class of acupuncture points that could were the a shi points. Moreover, Birch concluded that no more than 40% of the acupuncture points examined by Melzack et al.

Author(s): 
Dorsher, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVES: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are important aspects of musculoskeletal medicine, including chiropractic. The purpose of this study was to review the most commonly used treatment procedures in chiropractic for MPS and MTrPs. METHODS: The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care. This article is the outcome of this charge.

Author(s): 
Vernon, Howard
Schneider, Michael
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

Due to a change in the production schedule of this journal, two issues of this article were due within a month of each other, which precluded the usual group of authors from contributing to the current paper, but they will participate in this review in the next issue. This overview includes several articles questioning the use of dry needling (DN) by non-acupuncturists, which continues to be a controversial topic especially in the United States. Several researchers examined the effects of manual trigger point (TrP) techniques applied to TrPs in the upper trapezius muscle.

Author(s): 
Dommerholt, Jan
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of manual acupuncture (MA) in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). METHODS: We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing MA versus sham/placebo or no intervention in patients with MPS in the following databases from inception to January 2016: PubMed; Cochrane Library; Embase; Web of Science; and China Biology Medicine. Two reviewers independently screened the literature extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies according to the risk of bias tool recommended by the Cochrane Handbook (V.5.1.0).

Author(s): 
Wang, Rong
Li, Xiuxia
Zhou, Shenghu
Zhang, Xiaogang
Yang, Kehu
Li, Xusheng
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

The second article in this review series considers multiple recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. The article is divided into several sections, including a Basic Research section (4 articles), a section on Soft Tissue Approaches (5 articles), a Dry Needling and Acupuncture section (7 articles), an Injection section (2 articles), a section on. Modalities (1 article), Other Clinical Approaches (3 articles) and finally a Reviews section (7 articles). The thirty publications reviewed in this article originated in all corners of the world.

Author(s): 
Dommerholt, Jan
Layton, Michelle
Hooks, Todd
Grieve, Rob
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect and safety of miniscalpel-needle (MSN) on reducing the pain of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). METHODS: We reviewed the available literatures inception up to February 2014 using Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, Chinese Biomedical Database and Wanfang Database. RESULTS: Eight randomized controlled trials were finally identified. The main controls involved acupuncture, medications, injection, massage and cupping.

Author(s): 
Liu, Tong
Peng, Yuanyuan
Zhu, Shipeng
Chen, Huan
Li, Fuyun
Hong, Peixin
Cao, Bingyan
Peng, Bo
Fan, Yifan
Chen, Yupei
Zhang, Li

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