Myofascial Pain Syndromes

Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: To present an algorithm of sequential treatment options for managing myofascial pain (MP) in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. METHODS: A modified Delphi process was used to synthesize evidence-based recommendations. A multidisciplinary expert panel developed the algorithm, which was subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care physician panel. RESULTS: We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with MP, an important contributor to chronic low back pain (CLBP).

Author(s): 
Lisi, Anthony J.
Breuer, Paula
Gallagher, Rollin M.
Rodriguez, Eric
Rossi, Michelle I.
Schmader, Kenneth
Scholten, Joel D.
Weiner, Debra K.
Publication Title: 
Minerva Stomatologica

Transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (l.f.-h.i. TENS), employed in dentistry, allows masticatory muscles relaxation, temporary clearance of muscular and periodontal proprioceptive input and even oro-facial pain relief. The mechanisms involved in this type of stimulation are not entirely clarified. According to the most recent neurophysiological researches, the authors describe several l.f.-h.i. TENS. action modalities.

Author(s): 
Galletti, S. P.
Bergamini, M.
Pantaleo, T.
Publication Title: 
Versicherungsmedizin / Herausgegeben Von Verband Der Lebensversicherungs-Unternehmen e.V. Und Verband Der Privaten Krankenversicherung e.V

A host of alternative treatment methods are sold to us as reputable science on the "supermarket of naturopathy" nowadays. "Foot zone therapy", also known as "reflexology" is one of them. Advocates of reflexology claim that certain zones of the feet are linked to internal organs; that "energy forces" run throughout the human body. According to the teachings of Ayurveda and Yoga, a network of more than 72,000 nerve tracts (energy tracts = meridians) is linked to a single, tiny point on the feet, where the energy ends.

Author(s): 
Heide, M.
Heide, M. H.
Publication Title: 
Versicherungsmedizin / Herausgegeben Von Verband Der Lebensversicherungs-Unternehmen e.V. Und Verband Der Privaten Krankenversicherung e.V

A host of alternative treatment methods are sold to us as reputable science on the "supermarket of naturopathy" nowadays. "Foot zone therapy", also known as "reflexology" is one of them. Advocates of reflexology claim that certain zones of the feet are linked to internal organs; that "energy forces" run throughout the human body. According to the teachings of Ayurveda and Yoga, a network of more than 72,000 nerve tracts (energy tracts = meridians) is linked to a single, tiny point on the feet, where the energy ends.

Author(s): 
Heide, M.
Heide, M. H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

OBJECTIVE: In this study we modeled repetitive motion strain (RMS) and myofascial release (MFR) in vitro to investigate possible cellular and molecular mechanisms to potentially explain the immediate clinical outcomes associated with RMS and MFR. METHOD: Cultured human fibroblasts were strained with 8h RMS, 60s MFR and combined treatment; RMS+MFR. Fibroblasts were immediately sampled upon cessation of strain and evaluated for cell morphology, cytokine secretions, proliferation, apoptosis, and potential changes to intracellular signaling molecules.

Author(s): 
Meltzer, Kate R.
Cao, Thanh V.
Schad, Joseph F.
King, Hollis
Stoll, Scott T.
Standley, Paul R.
Publication Title: 
Biomedical Instrumentation & Technology / Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation

Eighty-one patients suffering from neck pain and tension-type headaches were treated by the application of a unique physical therapy device combining transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), traction, massage, vibration, and acupressure applied to the forehead, posterior cervical spine, and scapula. The device employed eight silver silicone electrodes for modality application. Its safety and effectiveness were assessed by evaluating patients before and after treatment. No complication ensued.

Author(s): 
Stone, R. G.
Wharton, R. B.
Publication Title: 
Pain

The effect of treatment with ultrasound, massage and exercises on myofascial trigger-points (MTrP) in the neck and shoulder was assessed in a randomised controlled trial. The outcome measures were pain at rest and on daily function (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), analgesic usage, global preference and index of MTrP. Long-term effect for treatment and control groups was assessed after 6 months using a questionnaire. The patients were randomised to three groups.

Author(s): 
Gam, A. N.
Warming, S.
Larsen, L. H.
Jensen, B.
Høydalsmo, O.
Allon, I.
Andersen, B.
Gøtzsche, N. E.
Petersen, M.
Mathiesen, B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate the effects of myofascial trigger-point massage therapy to the head, neck and shoulder areas on cardiac autonomic tone.Background. No studies have reported on the effect of back massage on autonomic tone as measured by heart rate variability. This is especially relevant to the nursing profession, as massage is increasingly available as a therapy complementary to conventional nursing practice.

Author(s): 
Delaney, Joseph P. A.
Leong, King Sun
Watkins, Alan
Brodie, David
Publication Title: 
Current Pain and Headache Reports

Complementary medical therapies are commonly used for the treatment and management of myofascial pain. No universally accepted therapy for this condition exists; consequently, patients often seek alternative and complementary therapies. Many complementary treatments are available.This article focuses on acupuncture, biofeedback, ultrasound, lasers, and massage. Although anecdotally claimed as effective, most of these modalities have not been rigorously investigated because of poor research quality. Appropriate controls, sample sizes, and blinding measures are often lacking.

Author(s): 
Harris, R. E.
Clauw, D. J.
Publication Title: 
Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi = Chinese Medical Journal; Free China Ed

This review article summarizes recent studies on myofascial trigger point (MTrP) to further clarify the mechanism of MTrP. MTrP is the major cause of muscle pain (myofascial pain) in clinical practice. There are multiple MTrP loci in an MTrP region. An MTrP locus contains a sensory component (sensitive locus) and a motor component (active locus). A sensitive locus is the site from which pain, referred pain (ReP), and local twitch response (LTR) can be elicited by needle stimulation. Sensitive loci are probably sensitized nociceptors based on a histological study.

Author(s): 
Hong, Chang-Zern

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