Narcissism

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

This paper traces the transformation of narcissism, paralleling the transformations of object love, occurring between early and late adolescence. Narcissism is examined in terms of three lines of development: erotic self-love, omnipotence, and the regulations of self-esteem. The transition occurs relatively rapidly in most normal and psychoneurotic individuals and involves a massive reorganization of the psyche. The acquisition of a body image of an adult sort probably acts an organizer. A normal consequence is the first romantic love relationship.

Author(s): 
Spruiell, V.
Publication Title: 
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly

The development of narcissism is usually studied from the standpoint of the drives, or more specifically of the libido. This paper considers narcissism from the standpoint of the ego and seeks to delineate separate developmental lines. From this point of view, a variety of forms may be distinguished which are ordinarily structured during the oedipal period. It is postulated that narcissism cannot be considered as truly separable from the vicissitudes of the love and hate of objects.

Author(s): 
Spruiell, V.
Publication Title: 
The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

After giving an introductory outline of the phenomenology and theoretical aspects of the concept "love affair", the author proceeds to review a number of symptomatic love affairs arising in the lives of a series of female patients during the course of analytically oriented psychotherapy.. The material is presented in its general aspects and in the form of one detailed case history. In subsequent discussion the author attempts to explain the genesis of these love affairs in terms of phase-speciifc conflicts in the patient and certain iatrogenic aspects of the therapy.

Author(s): 
Christie, G. L.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

The symbiotic phase of development is crucially involved in determing the nature of psychopathology as well as promoting psychic processes that are involved in creative activity and intimate object relationships. In a well-established object relationship, the partners relate to each other in a symbiotic fashion. From the analysis of married persons (and some clinical material is presented in this paper), the author concludes that the fundamental character structure, psychopathological or otherwise, of each spouse is identical.

Author(s): 
Giovacchini, P. L.
Publication Title: 
The Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law

Five cases are presented wherein the violent person had had no substantial previous history of violence. Each of these people idealized the partner, were unable to accept the fact that the relationship was at an end and split off the anger. Frantic attempts to repair the relationship were made. Under various psychophysiological conditions, dyscontrol resulted in an outburst of violence toward the loved one.

Author(s): 
Bursten, B.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

The psychoanalytic literature on shame is critically reviewed. A vagueness and incompleteness in formulations is noted which appears to be related to an adherence to the structural and topographical models. Shame is shown to have a clearly defined place in object-relations theory, in particular within the theory of narcissism as developed elsewhere by the author. It is the signal, affective and cognitive, that a move from 'self-narcissism' to 'object-narcissism' is about to occur.

Author(s): 
Kinston, W.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry

There is, in my opinion, a rapprochement between the theories of psychoanalysis and existential-phenomenology. It is my major theoretical interest to articulate the points at which true dialogue between these different perspectives is possible. Such an effort is not an attempt to merge the two theories or subordinate one to the other; rather, I hope that the theoretical positions of both will be clarified and that the therapeutic dialogue of practitioners who represent both perspectives will be benefited.

Author(s): 
Brice, C. W.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

The growth of object relationships may be studied along either the developmental line of the discharge-object or that of the reflexive-object. The former is the well-known line of development from the need-satisfying object to the constant object and is a study of id-ego relationships. The developmental line of the reflexive-object, on the other hand, follows the history of the introjects and is a study of either ego-superego or ego-ego ideal relationships. It is the latter which constitutes the study of narcissism.

Author(s): 
Parkin, A.
Publication Title: 
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly

This study of four of Keats's greatest poems explores a dynamic pattern in the poet's imagination: a relationship between the oral/fusional imagery and the romantic/oedipal themes. The poet's imagination seems to have been propelled backward from oedipal conflict to earlier narcissistic/oral unrest and pleasure.

Author(s): 
Fitzpatrick-Hanly, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

Evidence is presented that Freud developed three very different theories on love. These theories were not integrated into a coherent theory. In subsequent developments each theory had its own history. The paper discusses the history of the controversy on the genital character, the relation between love and gender identity, between love and narcissism, the hierarchical structure of the capacity to love, and the relation between love and object loss. The impact of some concepts such as symbiosis and the rapprochmente subphase on the understanding of conflicts in loving is raised.

Author(s): 
Bergmann, M. S.

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