Nasal Mucosa

Publication Title: 
Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

Nociceptive, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves play critical roles in regulating glandular, vascular and other processes in airway mucosa. These functions are vital for cleaning and humidifying ambient air before it is inhaled into the lungs.

Author(s): 
Baraniuk, James N.
Publication Title: 
Acta Clinica Croatica

Nasal mucosa is innervated by multiple subsets of nociceptive, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves. These play carefully coordinated roles in regulating glandular, vascular and other processes. These functions are vital for cleaning and humidifying ambient air before it is inhaled into the lungs.

Author(s): 
Baraniuk, James N.
Merck, Samantha J.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Multiple subsets of nociceptive, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nerves innervate human nasal mucosa. These play carefully coordinated roles in regulating glandular, vascular, and other processes. These functions are vital for cleaning and humidifying ambient air before it is inhaled into the lungs. The recent identification of distinct classes of nociceptive nerves with unique patterns of transient receptor potential sensory receptor ion channel proteins may account for the polymodal, chemo- and mechanicosensitivity of many trigeminal neurons.

Author(s): 
Baraniuk, James N.
Merck, Samantha J.
Publication Title: 
Free Radical Biology & Medicine

In cystic fibrosis reduced CFTR function may alter redox properties of airway epithelial cells. Redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP1) and imaging microscopy were used to measure the redox potentials of the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria, and cell surface of cystic fibrosis nasal epithelial cells and CFTR-corrected cells. We also measured glutathione and cysteine thiol redox states in cell lysates and apical fluids to provide coverage over a range of redox potentials and environments that might be affected by CFTR.

Author(s): 
Schwarzer, Christian
Illek, Beate
Suh, Jung H.
Remington, S. James
Fischer, Horst
Machen, Terry E.
Publication Title: 
Toxicologic Pathology

Compared to healthy subjects, individuals with allergic airway disease (e.g., asthma, allergic rhinitis) have enhanced inflammatory responses to inhaled ozone. We created a rodent model of ozone-enhanced allergic nasal responses in Brown Norway rats to test the therapeutic effects of the dietary supplement gamma-tocopherol (gammaT). Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized rats were intranasally challenged with 0% or 0.5% OVA (in saline) on Days 1 and 2, and then exposed to 0 or 1 ppm ozone (eight hours/day) on Days 4 and 5.

Author(s): 
Wagner, James G.
Harkema, Jack R.
Jiang, Qing
Illek, Beate
Ames, Bruce N.
Peden, David B.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy

BACKGROUND: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) occurs at high frequency in patients with cystic fibrosis, suggesting that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride (Cl) ion channel might be involved in the development of chronic sinusitis in the general population. CFTR Cl ion transport controls the hydration of mucosal surfaces and promotes effective mucociliary clearance. Altered ion transport and, hence, disrupted mucociliary function, could play a role in the pathogenesis of sinus disease.

Author(s): 
Cho, Do-Yeon
Hwang, Peter H.
Illek, Beate
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy

BACKGROUND: Proton (H+) secretion and the HVCN1 H+ channel are part of the innate host defense mechanism of the airways. The objective of this study was to determine H+ secretion in asthmatic and nonasthmatic patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in freshly excised human sinonasal tissue. METHODS: Nasal or sinus mucosa from subjects with three different conditions (normal, CRS, and CRS with asthma) was harvested during sinus surgery. The equilibrium pH and the rate of H+ secretion were measured in an Ussing chamber using the pH-stat titration technique.

Author(s): 
Cho, Do-Yeon
Hajighasemi, Mohammad
Hwang, Peter H.
Illek, Beate
Fischer, Horst
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology

Therapies to correct the ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) folding defect require sensitive methods to detect channel activity in vivo. The β₂ adrenergic receptor agonists, which provide the CFTR stimuli commonly used in nasal potential difference assays, may not overcome the channel gating defects seen in ΔF508 CFTR after plasma membrane localization. In this study, we identify an agent, quercetin, that enhances the detection of surface ΔF508 CFTR, and is suitable for nasal perfusion.

Author(s): 
Pyle, Louise C.
Fulton, Jennifer C.
Sloane, Peter A.
Backer, Kyle
Mazur, Marina
Prasain, Jeevan
Barnes, Stephen
Clancy, J. P.
Rowe, Steven M.
Publication Title: 
The Laryngoscope

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder that produces lifelong difficulties with chronic airway inflammation. Little is known about the role of chronic airway inflammation on chloride ion transport properties in PCD. This study assessed the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-regulated chloride (Cl) ion transport properties of freshly excised nasal mucosa from PCD compared with normal and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS).

Author(s): 
Cho, Do-Yeon
Hwang, Peter H.
Illek, Beate
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Research

BACKGROUND: The upper respiratory tract functions to protect lower respiratory structures from chemical and biological agents in inspired air. Cellular oxidative stress leading to acute and chronic inflammation contributes to the resultant pathology in many of these exposures and is typical of allergic disease, chronic sinusitis, pollutant exposure, and bacterial and viral infections. Little is known about the effective means by which topical treatment of the nose can strengthen its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses.

Author(s): 
Gao, Meixia
Singh, Anju
Macri, Kristin
Reynolds, Curt
Singhal, Vandana
Biswal, Shyam
Spannhake, Ernst W.

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