Nausea

Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Yoga is increasingly used as a complementary therapy to manage disease and treatment-related side effects in patients with cancer and has resulted in an increase in the number of studies exploring the effectiveness of yoga interventions. This systematic review examines whether yoga interventions provide any measurable benefit, both physically and psychologically, for women with breast cancer. The results will inform future research in this field and advance the development of yoga programmes.

Author(s): 
Harder, H.
Parlour, L.
Jenkins, V.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha
Deng, Gary
Hershman, Dawn
Mumber, Matthew
Perlmutter, Jane
Seely, Dugald
Sen, Ananda
Zick, Suzanna M.
Tripathy, Debu
Society for Integrative Oncology
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha
Deng, Gary
Hershman, Dawn
Mumber, Matthew
Perlmutter, Jane
Seely, Dugald
Sen, Ananda
Zick, Suzanna M.
Tripathy, Debu
Society for Integrative Oncology
Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing: Official Journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) continues to be a common symptom experienced by children undergoing cancer treatment despite the use of contemporary antiemetics. Integrative therapeutic approaches in addition to standard pharmacologic antiemetic regimes offer potential to control CINV. The purpose of this review was to identify current evidence on integrative therapeutic approaches for the control of CINV in children with cancer. Online search engines (PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO) were queried using MESH terms.

Author(s): 
Momani, Tha'er G.
Berry, Donna L.
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: We aimed to update the 2011 recommendations for the prevention and treatment of anticipatory nausea and vomiting in children and adults receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: The original systematic literature search was updated.

Author(s): 
Dupuis, L. Lee
Roscoe, Joseph A.
Olver, Ian
Aapro, Matti
Molassiotis, Alexander
Publication Title: 
Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVE: To review available evidence about the effectiveness of alternative therapies for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and 13 additional US and international data bases were searched in 1996-1997 for papers that described use of alternative medicine in the treatment of pregnancy and pregnancy complications, specifically those addressing nausea, vomiting, and hyperemesis. Bibliographies of retrieved papers were reviewed to identify additional sources. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: All relevant English language clinical research papers were reviewed.

Author(s): 
Aikins Murphy, P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

To review the evidence for efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities in treating pain, dyspnea, and nausea and vomiting in patients near the end of life, original articles were evaluated following a search through MEDLINE, CancerLIT, AIDSLINE, PsycLIT, CINAHL, and Social Work Abstracts databases. Search terms included alternative medicine, palliative care, pain, dyspnea, and nausea. Two independent reviewers extracted data, including study design, subjects, sample size, age, response rate, CAM modality, and outcomes.

Author(s): 
Pan, C. X.
Morrison, R. S.
Ness, J.
Fugh-Berman, A.
Leipzig, R. M.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Cancer Care

To systematically review the research evidence on the effectiveness of hypnosis for cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). A comprehensive search of major biomedical databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, ClNAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library was conducted. Specialist complementary and alternative medicine databases were searched and efforts were made to identify unpublished and ongoing research. Citations were included from the databases' inception to March 2005. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were appraised and meta-analysis undertaken.

Author(s): 
Richardson, J.
Smith, J. E.
McCall, G.
Richardson, A.
Pilkington, K.
Kirsch, I.

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