Neck

Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration-deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries.

Author(s): 
Binder, Allan I.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. Exercise is one treatment approach. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercises to improve pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, MANTIS, ClinicalTrials.gov and three other computerized databases up to between January and May 2014 plus additional sources (reference checking, citation searching, contact with authors).

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Kay, Theresa M.
Paquin, Jean-Philippe
Blanchette, Samuel
Lalonde, Patrick
Christie, Trevor
Dupont, Genevieve
Graham, Nadine
Burnie, Stephen J.
Gelley, Geoff
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Forget, Mario
Hoving, Jan L.
Brønfort, Gert
Santaguida, Pasqualina L.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. Exercise is one treatment approach. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercises to improve pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, MANTIS, ClinicalTrials.gov and three other computerized databases up to between January and May 2014 plus additional sources (reference checking, citation searching, contact with authors).

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Kay, Theresa M.
Paquin, Jean-Philippe
Blanchette, Samuel
Lalonde, Patrick
Christie, Trevor
Dupont, Genevieve
Graham, Nadine
Burnie, Stephen J.
Gelley, Geoff
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Forget, Mario
Hoving, Jan L.
Brønfort, Gert
Santaguida, Pasqualina L.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

This paper examines some of the problems specifically associated with conducting research into acupuncture and how this can lead to further problems with subsequent systematic reviews. Studies for the treatment of chronic neck pain have been used as examples of how presented information can be misleading to an acupuncture-naive reader and how researchers must be sensitive to these problems when compiling their inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
White, P.
Lewith, G.
Berman, B.
Birch, S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: A 1977 study by Melzack et al. reported 100% anatomic and 71% clinical pain correspondences of myofascial trigger points and classical acupuncture points in the treatment of pain disorders. A reanalysis of this study's data using different acupuncture resources by Birch a quarter century later concluded that correlating trigger points to classical acupuncture points was not conceptually possible and that the only class of acupuncture points that could were the a shi points. Moreover, Birch concluded that no more than 40% of the acupuncture points examined by Melzack et al.

Author(s): 
Dorsher, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration-deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries.

Author(s): 
Binder, Allan I.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Manipulation and mobilisation are often used, either alone or combined with other treatment approaches, to treat neck pain. OBJECTIVES: To assess if manipulation or mobilisation improves pain, function/disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life, and global perceived effect in adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radicular findings. SEARCH STRATEGY: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 3) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, Manual Alternative and Natural Therapy, CINAHL, and Index to Chiropractic Literature were updated to July 2009.

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Miller, Jordan
D'Sylva, Jonathan
Burnie, Stephen J.
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Graham, Nadine
Haines, Ted
Brønfort, Gert
Hoving, Jan L.
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

This paper examines some of the problems specifically associated with conducting research into acupuncture and how this can lead to further problems with subsequent systematic reviews. Studies for the treatment of chronic neck pain have been used as examples of how presented information can be misleading to an acupuncture-naive reader and how researchers must be sensitive to these problems when compiling their inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
White, P.
Lewith, G.
Berman, B.
Birch, S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: A 1977 study by Melzack et al. reported 100% anatomic and 71% clinical pain correspondences of myofascial trigger points and classical acupuncture points in the treatment of pain disorders. A reanalysis of this study's data using different acupuncture resources by Birch a quarter century later concluded that correlating trigger points to classical acupuncture points was not conceptually possible and that the only class of acupuncture points that could were the a shi points. Moreover, Birch concluded that no more than 40% of the acupuncture points examined by Melzack et al.

Author(s): 
Dorsher, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without radicular symptoms and cervicogenic headache (CGH) at immediate- to long-term follow-up.

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Langevin, Pierre
Burnie, Stephen J.
Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie
Empey, Brian
Dugas, Estelle
Faber-Dobrescu, Michael
Andres, Cristy
Graham, Nadine
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Brønfort, Gert
Hoving, Jan L.
LeBlanc, Francis

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