Neck Pain

Publication Title: 
Clinical Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to systematically assess and meta-analyze the effectiveness of yoga in relieving chronic neck pain. METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Scopus, and IndMED were screened through January 2017 for randomized controlled trials assessing neck pain intensity and/or neck pain-related disability in chronic neck pain patients. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life, mood, and safety. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Klose, Petra
Brinkhaus, Benno
Michalsen, Andreas
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to develop a clinical practice guideline on the management of neck pain-associated disorders (NADs) and whiplash-associated disorders (WADs). This guideline replaces 2 prior chiropractic guidelines on NADs and WADs. METHODS: Pertinent systematic reviews on 6 topic areas (education, multimodal care, exercise, work disability, manual therapy, passive modalities) were assessed using A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) and data extracted from admissible randomized controlled trials.

Author(s): 
Bussières, André E.
Stewart, Gregory
Al-Zoubi, Fadi
Decina, Philip
Descarreaux, Martin
Hayden, Jill
Hendrickson, Brenda
Hincapié, Cesar
Pagé, Isabelle
Passmore, Steven
Srbely, John
Stupar, Maja
Weisberg, Joel
Ornelas, Joseph
Publication Title: 
European Spine Journal: Official Publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society

PURPOSE: To develop an evidence-based guideline for the management of grades I-III neck pain and associated disorders (NAD). METHODS: This guideline is based on recent systematic reviews of high-quality studies. A multidisciplinary expert panel considered the evidence of effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness, societal and ethical values, and patient experiences (obtained from qualitative research) when formulating recommendations. Target audience includes clinicians; target population is adults with grades I-III NAD <6 months duration.

Author(s): 
Côté, Pierre
Wong, Jessica J.
Sutton, Deborah
Shearer, Heather M.
Mior, Silvano
Randhawa, Kristi
Ameis, Arthur
Carroll, Linda J.
Nordin, Margareta
Yu, Hainan
Lindsay, Gail M.
Southerst, Danielle
Varatharajan, Sharanya
Jacobs, Craig
Stupar, Maja
Taylor-Vaisey, Anne
van der Velde, Gabrielle
Gross, Douglas P.
Brison, Robert J.
Paulden, Mike
Ammendolia, Carlo
David Cassidy, J.
Loisel, Patrick
Marshall, Shawn
Bohay, Richard N.
Stapleton, John
Lacerte, Michel
Krahn, Murray
Salhany, Roger
Publication Title: 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches as part of their pain management strategy.

Author(s): 
Nahin, Richard L.
Boineau, Robin
Khalsa, Partap S.
Stussman, Barbara J.
Weber, Wendy J.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration-deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries.

Author(s): 
Binder, Allan I.
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2008, the Neck Pain Task Force (NPTF) recommended exercise for the management of neck pain and whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). However, no evidence was available on the effectiveness of exercise for Grade III neck pain or WAD. Moreover, limited evidence was available to contrast the effectiveness of various types of exercises. PURPOSE: To update the findings of the NPTF on the effectiveness of exercise for the management of neck pain and WAD grades I to III. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Systematic review and best evidence synthesis.

Author(s): 
Southerst, Danielle
Nordin, Margareta C.
Côté, Pierre
Shearer, Heather M.
Varatharajan, Sharanya
Yu, Hainan
Wong, Jessica J.
Sutton, Deborah A.
Randhawa, Kristi A.
van der Velde, Gabrielle M.
Mior, Silvano A.
Carroll, Linda J.
Jacobs, Craig L.
Taylor-Vaisey, Anne L.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Yoga

Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain.

Author(s): 
Crow, Edith Meszaros
Jeannot, Emilien
Trewhela, Alison
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2008, the lack of published evidence prevented the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders (Neck Pain Task Force [NPTF]) from commenting on the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the management of neck pain. PURPOSE: This study aimed to update findings of the NPTF and evaluate the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the management of neck pain and associated disorders (NAD) or whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This study used systematic review and best-evidence synthesis.

Author(s): 
Shearer, Heather M.
Carroll, Linda J.
Wong, Jessica J.
Côté, Pierre
Varatharajan, Sharanya
Southerst, Danielle
Sutton, Deborah A.
Randhawa, Kristi A.
Yu, Hainan
Mior, Silvano A.
van der Velde, Gabrielle M.
Nordin, Margareta C.
Stupar, Maja
Taylor-Vaisey, Anne L.
Publication Title: 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches as part of their pain management strategy.

Author(s): 
Nahin, Richard L.
Boineau, Robin
Khalsa, Partap S.
Stussman, Barbara J.
Weber, Wendy J.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. Exercise is one treatment approach. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercises to improve pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, MANTIS, ClinicalTrials.gov and three other computerized databases up to between January and May 2014 plus additional sources (reference checking, citation searching, contact with authors).

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Kay, Theresa M.
Paquin, Jean-Philippe
Blanchette, Samuel
Lalonde, Patrick
Christie, Trevor
Dupont, Genevieve
Graham, Nadine
Burnie, Stephen J.
Gelley, Geoff
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Forget, Mario
Hoving, Jan L.
Brønfort, Gert
Santaguida, Pasqualina L.
Cervical Overview Group

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