Neonatal Nursing

Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

Many children's nurses have significant contact with children who have breathing difficulties and should be using systematic criteria to assess their nursing needs. Children's nurses do not appear to follow systematic criteria but are strongly influenced by the medical model and this may be detrimental to holistic assessment and the development of nursing diagnoses based on nursing needs.

Author(s): 
Armitage, G.
Publication Title: 
Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing

This paper describes two studies that had three purposes: (a) to modify a parent-child interaction tool used previously in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); (b) to demonstrate interrater reliability, Chronbach's Alpha reliability, and construct validity of the tool with adolescent mothers, and (c) to determine the ability of nurses engaged in usual work duties to observe maternal behaviors. The first study tested interrater reliability. Two NICU nurses were trained, observed adolescent mothers (n = 20) for the same 15 min, and then separately completed the measure.

Author(s): 
Christopher, S. E.
Bauman, K. E.
Veness-Meehan, K.
Publication Title: 
Neonatal network: NN

PURPOSE: To investigate the development of feelings of attachment between fathers and their preterm infants and to identify factors that help or hinder this process. DESIGN: A longitudinal descriptive design was used to obtain fathers' perceptions of their infants, feelings for their infants, and other related factors. SAMPLE: A convenience sample of 27 fathers of preterm infants was recruited. MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLE: The main outcome variable was the time at which fathers first held their infants.

Author(s): 
Sullivan, J. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing

The purpose of this article is to share a "research journey" to study the somewhat controversial subject of Christian intercessory prayer (CIP) utilized as a clinical intervention, and the knowledge gained along the way. This article will explore the steps in the development and implementation of clinical research to scientifically examine a phenomenon that many say cannot--and should not--be studied.

Author(s): 
Rath, Linda L.
Publication Title: 
MCN. The American journal of maternal child nursing

This article describes a case study of infant massage for a neonate in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant massage is grounded in the theory of touch. In an NICU, the infant's tactile experiences can be uncomfortable or painful. This can lead to touch aversion. It is possible that providing pleasurable touch experiences through infant massage can help to develop touch acceptance. It is important to first assess the infant's readiness for massage according to his or her need and response.

Author(s): 
Lindrea, K. B.
Stainton, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Seminars in neonatology: SN

Preterm infants have been noted to benefit from massage therapy. Following massage therapy protocols using moderate pressure preterm infants have gained 31-49% more weight on average. Some studies have also shown length and head circumference growth and bone mineral density increases associated with massage therapy. These studies are reviewed in this paper along with discussion of potential underlying mechanisms.

Author(s): 
Field, Tiffany
Publication Title: 
Neonatal network: NN

Infant massage therapy is an inexpensive tool that should be utilized as part of the developmental care of the preterm infant. Nurses have been hesitant to begin massage therapy for fear of overstimulating the infant and because there has been insufficient research to prove its safety. Recent research, however, has shown that the significant benefits of infant massage therapy far outweigh the minimal risks. When infant massage therapy is properly applied to preterm infants, they respond with increased weight gains, improved developmental scores, and earlier discharge from the hospital.

Author(s): 
Beachy, Jodi M.
Publication Title: 
Hu Li Za Zhi The Journal of Nursing

Massage therapy has been used in the care of premature infants for many years in western countries, and a significant body of research has already shown the effectiveness of massage therapy in significantly increasing body weight, decreasing infant hospital durations, enhancing bone formation, and improving behavior. Key considerations when applying massage therapy on premature infants include gestational age, bodyweight, and physical condition. Nurses can teach parents to administer massage therapy on their premature infants to enhance parent-child attachment and interaction.

Author(s): 
Chang, Shu-Min
Sung, Huei-Chuan
Publication Title: 
Neonatal network: NN

Infant massage therapy is an inexpensive tool that should be utilized as part of the developmental care of the preterm infant. Nurses have been hesitant to begin massage therapy for fear of overstimulating the infant and because there has been insufficient research to prove its safety. Recent research, however, has shown that the significant benefits of infant massage therapy far outweigh the minimal risks. When infant massage therapy is properly applied to preterm infants, they respond with increased weight gains, improved developmental scores, and earlier discharge from the hospital.

Author(s): 
Beachy, Jodi M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN / NAACOG

A 1997 survey revealed that 40% of Americans use some type of complementary therapy or medicine and that many use such therapies in conjunction with treatments prescribed to them by conventional medical practitioners. One alternative modality that is growing in popularity is homeopathy. Although use of this modality is growing, many health care providers know very little about it. This article provides an introduction to homeopathy, including its historical origins and theoretical principles.

Author(s): 
Steinberg, Darryle
Beal, Margaret W.

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