Neoplasms, Experimental

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

INTRODUCTION: This is a systematic review of the animal models used in studies of high dilutions. The objectives are to analyze methodological quality of papers and reported results, and to highlight key conceptual aspects of high dilution to suggest clues concerning putative mechanisms of action. METHODS: Papers for inclusion were identified systematically, from the Pubmed-Medline database, using 'Homeopathy' and 'Animal' as keywords.

Author(s): 
Bonamin, Leoni Villano
Endler, Peter Christian
Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

Information about effects of protein and amino acid intake on carcinogenesis comes mainly from experiments on laboratory animals. In general, tumor formation and tumor growth are retarded in animals consuming protein- or amino acid-deficient diets, but the effects have been attributed mainly to reduced caloric intake or body weight. Nonetheless, some tumors grow well in animals consuming diets that contain levels of protein that are insufficient to meet their nutritional needs.

Author(s): 
Harper, A. E.
Publication Title: 
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. A, Comparative Physiology

1. The reduction of nutritional energy intake (joules) often reduces the incidence of both spontaneous and induced cancers in humans and experimental animals in an approximately dose-dependent manner. 2. To achieve the best preventive effect, the reduction of dietary intake should begin well before the carcinogen insult, should be intense enough (lowering the intake of joules by at least approx. 25-30%) and should last a long time, preferably even life-long. 3.

Author(s): 
Hocman, G.
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

The insulin-sensitizing drug phenformin, in addition to its clinical utility in type II diabetes, has been reported to lower blood lipids, reduce body fat, enhance cellular immunity, and--in rodents--to increase mean lifespan and retard the development of growth of cancer. Initial studies with the insulin-sensitizing nutrient chromium picolinate indicate that it aids glucose tolerance in type II diabetes, lowers elevated LDL cholesterol, reduces body fat while increasing lean mass, and--in rats--increases median lifespan.

Author(s): 
McCarty, M. F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dietetic Association

A high percentage of body fat is considered to be the primary cause of risks associated with high body weight. Yet body fat content per se may not cause the risks. The contribution of obesity to risks may be because overfilled adipose tissue cannot remove offending substances from circulation. The ability to remove excess glucose, lipids, and offending materials from circulation, not the amount of body fat, may be the important factor. People with large, partially filled adipose depots may have less risk than people with small, but filled adipose depots.

Author(s): 
Abernathy, R. P.
Black, D. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

Caloric restriction in species with a short life span has shown it can increase median and maximum life expectancy and reduce or delay the onset of most age-related diseases. The remarkable reproducibility of the phenomenon irrefutably proves its validity and makes caloric restriction one of the most frequently studied paradigms in experimental research on aging.

Author(s): 
Nicolas, A. S.
Lanzmann-Petithory, D.
Vellas, B.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Hardly an aspect of aging is more important than an organism's ability to withstand stress or to resist both internally and externally imposed insults. We know that as organisms loose their ability to resist these insults, aged organisms suffer more than the young. Therefore, a prime strategy for an organism's survival has been the evolutionarily adapted defense systems that guard against insult. For better survivability, an organism's defense system must be maximized to its full effect through well-coordinated networks of diverse biologically responsive elements.

Author(s): 
Yu, B. P.
Chung, H. Y.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research

PURPOSE: Ashwagandha is regarded as a wonder shrub of India and is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine and health tonics that claim its variety of health-promoting effects. Surprisingly, these claims are not well supported by adequate studies, and the molecular mechanisms of its action remain largely unexplored to date. We undertook a study to identify and characterize the antitumor activity of the leaf extract of ashwagandha.

Author(s): 
Widodo, Nashi
Kaur, Kamaljit
Shrestha, Bhupal G.
Takagi, Yasuomi
Ishii, Tetsuro
Wadhwa, Renu
Kaul, Sunil C.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research

PURPOSE: Ashwagandha is regarded as a wonder shrub of India and is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine and health tonics that claim its variety of health-promoting effects. Surprisingly, these claims are not well supported by adequate studies, and the molecular mechanisms of its action remain largely unexplored to date. We undertook a study to identify and characterize the antitumor activity of the leaf extract of ashwagandha.

Author(s): 
Widodo, Nashi
Kaur, Kamaljit
Shrestha, Bhupal G.
Takagi, Yasuomi
Ishii, Tetsuro
Wadhwa, Renu
Kaul, Sunil C.
Publication Title: 
In Vivo (Athens, Greece)

In this serial sacrifice experiment, celecoxib (C) was administered at a 0.1% dose level, in the diet of female Swiss Webster CFW outbred mice. The animals also received either 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (1,2-DMH) as ten weekly subcutaneous (s.c.) injections at 20 microg/g body weight or physiological saline (PS) as ten weekly s.c. injections at 0.01 ml/g body weight. Subsequently, the mice were sacrificed at 26 weeks or 35 weeks after the first injection of 1,2-DMH or PS.

Author(s): 
Toth, Bela
Coles, Melissa

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