Neurotic Disorders

Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Psychiatry: The Journal of Mental Science

The Ryle Marital Patterns Test measures the affection and domination aspects of marriage. Its original administration illustrated a partial association between poor marital adjustment (as measured by low affection scores and non-egalitarian domination scores) and neuroticism (as measured by CMI score). The present paper confirms these associations using a group of suburban women defined as neurotic by their GP. Related studies suggest similar patterns.

Author(s): 
Ineichen, B.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatrie, Neurologie, Und Medizinische Psychologie

Suicidality should not, in consideration of the present studies and the experience gained by the author, be considered a disease 'sui generis', but rather a symptom only. The etiopathogenesis of "nonpsychotic" suicidality is discussed with particular reference to the psychopathology thereof. Acts of suicide are most often part of "lasting affective reactions".

Author(s): 
Kulawik, H.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

With the help of clinical material obtained from two male patients in therapy at the same time, the concept of the loving father is examined. Both patients presented with a fear of being homosexual. It gradually became clear during the therapy that both of them were searching for a loving father.

Author(s): 
Layland, W. R.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Psychiatry: The Journal of Mental Science

The study tested Bowlby's hypothesis that experiencing the poor relating of parents in childhood predisposes the individual to poor relating in adult life. Data were drawn from two community samples: a younger sample of 25-34-year-old married women, and an older one of 40-49-year-old women. Data were also drawn from the husbands of the women in the younger sample. It focused on the single childhood variable of the recollection of poor maternal care.

Author(s): 
Birtchnell, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Terror management theory posits that sex is a ubiquitous human problem because the creaturely aspects of sex make apparent our animal nature, which reminds us of our vulnerability and mortality. People minimize this threat by investing in the symbolic meaning offered by the cultural worldview. Because people high in neuroticism have difficulty finding or sustaining meaning, sex is a particular problem for them. In Study 1, mortality salience caused high-neuroticism participants to find the physical aspects of sex less appealing.

Author(s): 
Goldenberg, J. L.
Pyszczynski, T.
McCoy, S. K.
Greenberg, J.
Solomon, S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Sex Research

We offer a theoretical perspective to provide insight into why people are ambivalent about sex and why cultures regulate sex and attach symbolic meaning to it. Building on terror management theory, we propose that sex is problematic for humankind in part because it reminds us of our creaturely mortal nature. Two experiments investigated the effects of reminding people of the similarity between humans and other animals on their reactions to the physical aspects of sex.

Author(s): 
Goldenberg, Jamie L.
Cox, Cathy R.
Pyszczynski, Tom
Greenberg, Jeff
Solomon, Sheldon
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlates and consequences of two constructs related to affective experience: neuroticism and affective instability. METHOD: One hundred thirty-two patients were assessed at intake for axis I and II symptoms, general personality traits, and specific impairments, including impairments in interpersonal functioning. The data included responses to structured and semistructured interviews, self-reports of interpersonal problems, and reports of interpersonal problems from significant others.

Author(s): 
Miller, Joshua D.
Pilkonis, Paul A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality

An implicit preference for the self over others may be beneficial when pursuing one's own desires but costly when adjusting the self to the desires of others. On the basis of this reasoning, the authors hypothesized that Agreeableness and implicit self-esteem would interact in predicting measures of neurotic distress.

Author(s): 
Robinson, Michael D.
Wilkowski, Benjamin M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

The present study examined individual differences in change in extraversion, neuroticism, and work and relationship satisfaction. Of particular interest were the correlations between changes. Data were from the Victorian Quality of Life Panel Study (B. Headey & A. Wearing, 1989, 1992), in which an overall 1,130 individuals participated (ages 16 to 70). Respondents were assessed every 2 years from 1981 to 1989. Four major findings emerged. (a) There were significant individual differences in changes in extraversion and neuroticism. (b) Change was not limited to young adulthood.

Author(s): 
Scollon, Christie Napa
Diener, Ed
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

This paper develops an integration of psychoanalytic and wisdom tradition concepts to answer the question as to why nature does not turn off neurosis, The proposed answer is that nature wants a person to exploit the neurosis for two gains, one being the increase in adaptive capacity resulting from releasing it and the second involving the difficulty in the release itself, the latter related to gains proffered by the world's wisdom traditions.

Author(s): 
Badalamenti, Anthony F.

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