North Carolina

Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Five studies investigated the links among narcissism, self-esteem, and love. Across all studies, narcissism was associated primarily with a game-playing love style. This link was found in reports of general love styles (Study 1a) and of love in ongoing romantic relationships (Studies 1b-3, 5). Narcissists' game-playing love style was the result of a need for power and autonomy (Study 2) and was linked with greater relationship alternatives and lesser commitment (Study 3).

Author(s): 
Campbell, W. Keith
Foster, Craig A.
Finkel, Eli J.
Publication Title: 
AIDS patient care and STDs

Patient navigation, a patient-centered model of care coordination focused on reducing barriers to care, is an emerging strategy for linking patients to and retaining them in HIV care. The Guide to Healing Program (G2H), implemented at the Infectious Diseases Clinic at UNC Chapel Hill, provided patient navigation to women of color (WOC) new to or re-engaging in HIV care through a 'nurse guide' with mental health training and experience. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore patients' experiences working with the nurse guide.

Author(s): 
Sullivan, Kristen A.
Schultz, Katherine
Ramaiya, Megan
Berger, Miriam
Parnell, Heather
Quinlivan, E. Byrd
Publication Title: 
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999)

BACKGROUND: Although African Americans are disproportionately affected by the AIDS epidemic, they are underrepresented in AIDS research, particularly in AIDS clinical trials. This study examines a multidimensional construct of distrust and other factors that may affect willingness to participate in AIDS research. METHODS: A total of 301 African Americans (aged >/=18 years) in Durham, North Carolina participated in a cross-sectional survey. In-person interviews, 20 to 25 minutes in length, were conducted with participants.

Author(s): 
Sengupta, S.
Strauss, R. P.
DeVellis, R.
Quinn, S. C.
DeVellis, B.
Ware, W. B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999)

This study examined perceived risks, benefits, and desired information related to willingness to volunteer in preventive HIV vaccine trials. SAMPLE: Purposive sampling was used to select 90 participants among injecting drug users (Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.); gay men (San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.); and black Americans (Durham, NC, U.S.A.). METHODS: A qualitative interview guide elicited perceived benefits, risks, and desired information relating to trial participation. Themes were developed from the transcribed texts and from freelists.

Author(s): 
Strauss, R. P.
Sengupta, S.
Kegeles, S.
McLellan, E.
Metzger, D.
Eyre, S.
Khanani, F.
Emrick, C. B.
MacQueen, K. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

We examined the proxy decision-making and informed consent processes for clinical research involving 49 patient-subjects with dementia in an outpatient setting by performing serial in-depth, structured, open-ended telephone interviews. Interviews were tape recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were then coded and analyzed.

Author(s): 
Sugarman, J.
Cain, C.
Wallace, R.
Welsh-Bohmer, K. A.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The North Carolina protocol is a seven-session hypnosis-treatment approach for irritable bowel syndrome that is unique in that the entire course of treatment is designed for verbatim delivery. The protocol has been tested in two published research studies and found to benefit more than 80% of patients. This article describes the development, content, and testing of the protocol, and how it is used in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Palsson, Olafur S.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in 2006.

Author(s): 
Kemper, Kathi J.
Dirkse, Deborah
Eadie, Dee
Pennington, Melissa
Publication Title: 
Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine therapies used by certified nurse-midwives in North Carolina. METHODS: Surveys were sent to all 120 licensed certified nurse-midwives in North Carolina requesting information concerning their recommendations for use of complementary and alternative medicine for their pregnant or postpartum patients. RESULTS: Eighty-two responses were received (68.3%). Seventy-seven (93.9%) reported recommending complementary and alternative medicine to their pregnant patients in the past year.

Author(s): 
Allaire, A. D.
Moos, M. K.
Wells, S. R.
Publication Title: 
Health Education & Behavior: The Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education

Despite multidisciplinary efforts to control the nation's obesity epidemic, obesity has persisted as one of the U.S.'s top public health problems, particularly among African Americans. Innovative approaches to address obesity that are sensitive to the unique issues of African Americans are needed. Thus, a faith-based weight-loss intervention using a community-based participatory research approach was developed, implemented, and evaluated with a rural African American faith community.

Author(s): 
Kim, Karen Hye-cheon
Linnan, Laura
Campbell, Marci Kramish
Brooks, Christine
Koenig, Harold G.
Wiesen, Christopher
Publication Title: 
Hospital & Community Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: The study examined associations between religious variables and alcohol abuse and dependence among 2,969 North Carolina residents aged 18 to 97 who participated in the 1983-1984 National Institute of Mental Health Epidemiologic Catchment Area survey at its Piedmont location. METHODS: Six-month and lifetime prevalence of alcohol disorders were compared among participants reporting varying levels of religious activity.

Author(s): 
Koenig, H. G.
George, L. K.
Meador, K. G.
Blazer, D. G.
Ford, S. M.

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