Nurses

Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This essay chronicles the development of Catholic health care in the United States during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. The author points to the religious pluralism and the respect for that pluralism as well as to the evangelical drive for conversion evident in Catholic hospitals. This essay is a phenomenological study of this commitment to pluralism and the evangelical impulse within the contexts of health care.

Author(s): 
Kauffman, Christopher J.
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

Collaboration provides a unique opportunity for a variety of people and organizations to promote faith community nursing. With emphasis on holistic nursing, stewardship, and interpreting the dialogue between faith and health, educated nurses acting as health educators, planners, and counselors can aid in meeting the health needs and in promoting the well-being of their faith communities.

Author(s): 
Pattillo, Marilyn M.
Chesley, Dorothy
Castles, Pam
Sutter, Rebecca
Publication Title: 
Journal of Nursing Management

AIM: The study investigated the three symptoms of burnout among hospital nurses and examined the buffering effects of optimism and proactive coping in relation to burnout. BACKGROUND: Nursing is a profession that can easily lead to burnout. Burnout has been one of the most investigated work outcomes in current research. Previous research has largely ignored the positive influence of individuals on job outcomes and has not tested a constructive framework that might facilitate interventions to prevent burnout.

Author(s): 
Chang, Yuhsuan
Chan, Hsin-Ju
Publication Title: 
Aging & Mental Health

OBJECTIVES: The number of people who will require institutional care for dementia is rapidly rising. This increase raises questions about how the workforce can meet the challenge of providing quality care. A promising psychological concept that could improve staff and care recipient outcomes is staff sense of competence in their capacity to provide dementia care. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relative importance of staff factors associated with sense of competence. METHOD: Sixty-one Australian dementia care staff (mostly nurses, 69%; and allied health, 21%) were recruited.

Author(s): 
Mullan, Margaret A.
Sullivan, Karen A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

The words 'nurse' and 'nursing' originate in the word 'nurture' which dates back to the 14th century. 'Nurturance' appeared for the first time in the 1976 Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary and in a United States dictionary in 1983. Etymologically and semantically bound to nursing, little is known about the term nurturance.

Author(s): 
Geissler, E. M.
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

Phenomenological interviews with 23 nurses and more than 200 hours of participant observation on units of one cancer hospital were conducted to obtain a better understanding of how nurses caring for patients with cancer view their work. When asked to discuss a "critical incident" that captures the essence of oncology nursing for them, most nurses described acute physiologic emergencies. A few nurses described psychosocial needs and explained how they had helped or were unable to help patients and families deal with these needs.

Author(s): 
Cohen, M. Z.
Sarter, B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

This paper explores nursing's current fascination with defining and exploring the term 'caring'. Fear of caring is proposed as the reason for this fascination. Factors at the root of this fear are identified and an expanded definition of caring (one which arises from the dispelling of such fear) is proposed. This expanded definition is given a new label--loving. For, as this author contends, has not loving always been at the heart of nursing?

Author(s): 
Jacono, B. J.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Inquiry

This paper is an interpretive analysis of the discourses within popular romance literature, with a particular focus on the genre that includes constructions of the images of nurses and nursing. An historical contrast is made along with examinations of the uses and meanings encompassed within this body of literature, and its messages for women as nurses as it reflects/creates societal change. Deviations from the formulaic nature of these works are explored.

Author(s): 
DeVries, S.
Dunlop, M.
Goopy, S.
Moyle, W.
Sutherland-Lockhart, D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

My original paper suggested that an ethics of care which failed to specify how, and about what, to care would be devoid of normative and descriptive content. Bradshaw's approach provides such a specification and is, therefore, not devoid of such content. However, as all ethical approaches suggest something about the 'what' and 'how' of care, they are all 'ethics of care' in this broader sense. This reinforces rather than undermines my original conclusion.

Author(s): 
Allmark, Peter
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

The aim of this study was to explore the ethical foundations for a caring The analysis is based on the ethics of Paul Ricoeur and deals with questions such as what kind of person the nurse ought to be and how she or he engages in caring conversations with suffering others. According to Ricoeur, ethics (the aim of an accomplished life) has primacy over morality (the articulation of aims in norms). At the ethical level, self-esteem and autonomy were shown to be essential for a person (nurse) to act with respect and responsibility.

Author(s): 
Fredriksson, Lennart
Eriksson, Katie

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