Nurses

Publication Title: 
Nursing Standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain): 1987)

Enrolled nurse training was phased out in the UK during the 1980s, but most English-speaking countries retain second-level nurses and in Australia and New Zealand the role is flourishing. Enrolled nurses can take on a high level of responsibility while maintaining close contact with patients. They are an attractive option for employers. In the UK there seems little prospect that enrolled nurse will be revived.

Author(s): 
Dean, Erin
Publication Title: 
International Nursing Review

This study investigates attitudes related to the image of nurses and physicians across 30 cultures, using six concepts. Significant differences were found between physician and nurse with respect to power. Moreover, although the physician was highly correlated with knowledge and independence the nurse was correlated with kindness. Nurses' ability to influence health care decision-making may be limited if they are viewed as powerless, and they must address this deficit in their public image.

Author(s): 
Champion, V.
Austin, J.
Tzeng, O. C.
Publication Title: 
Gastroenterology Nursing: The Official Journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates

At some point in our lives, we often envision ourselves in other roles. Being an author is usually a fleeting thought. Nurses have the opportunity to share their professional expertise, the latest research information, or stories of human kindness and compassion. You may often intend to write, but lose the motivation when you think that you are not really capable. Although you may never attain the level of Shakespeare, James Joyce, or Mark Twain, you can still have the satisfaction of seeing your article in print. All it takes is a little organization.

Author(s): 
Barnie, D. C.
Publication Title: 
International Nursing Review

This study investigates attitudes related to the image of nurses and physicians across 30 cultures, using six concepts. Significant differences were found between physician and nurse with respect to power. Moreover, although the physician was highly correlated with knowledge and independence the nurse was correlated with kindness. Nurses' ability to influence health care decision-making may be limited if they are viewed as powerless, and they must address this deficit in their public image.

Author(s): 
Champion, V.
Austin, J.
Tzeng, O. C.
Publication Title: 
Gastroenterology Nursing: The Official Journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates

At some point in our lives, we often envision ourselves in other roles. Being an author is usually a fleeting thought. Nurses have the opportunity to share their professional expertise, the latest research information, or stories of human kindness and compassion. You may often intend to write, but lose the motivation when you think that you are not really capable. Although you may never attain the level of Shakespeare, James Joyce, or Mark Twain, you can still have the satisfaction of seeing your article in print. All it takes is a little organization.

Author(s): 
Barnie, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Medical Humanities

The Francis Report, the result of a UK public inquiry into ongoing mistreatment of patients at a large teaching hospital, revealed deep-rooted flaws in care delivery and professional performance. It led to regulatory review, policy initiatives and public outcry. To this point, it has not led to any extended or focused discussion on the sustenance or well-being of nurses so that we might avoid it happening again. This paper emerges from the writing and publication of a novel called Stranger Than Kindness and a subsequent PhD.

Author(s): 
Radcliffe, Mark
Publication Title: 
Creative Nursing

A nurse with newly diagnosed cancer presents her stream-of-consciousness impressions of this event, its meaning for her life, and the ways in which the gift of kindness makes a difference.

Author(s): 
Endress, Nancy
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Nursing Studies

BACKGROUND: Job stress and burnout are common among healthcare professionals, and nurses in particular. In addition to the heavy workload and lack of recourses, nurses are also confronted with emotionally intense situations associated with illness and suffering, which require empathic abilities. Although empathy is one of the core values in nursing, if not properly balanced it can also have detrimental consequences, such as compassion fatigue.

Author(s): 
Duarte, Joana
Pinto-Gouveia, JosÈ
Cruz, B·rbara
Publication Title: 
Nutrition and Health

Chocolate has a number of extremely appealing sensory qualities, and often are given by patients to those working in hospital wards as a token of their gratitude. This study examines whether this has any harmful effects. Eighty nine qualified nurses, 21 ward assistants, and 18 nursing students completed a structured questionnaire, showing that on average 5.4 chocolates were eaten each day. About 2/3 of the recipients ate 1-5 chocolates a day, while a few (3%) ate more than 20 per day. The most common reason given for eating them was simply because they were there.

Author(s): 
Cheung, S. T.
Publication Title: 
Revista Latino-Americana De Enfermagem

This descriptive study with qualitative approach aimed to identify the feelings that result from the practice and training of nurses working in mobile Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Nine nurses were interviewed in September 2007. Bardin's content analysis was used and six categories emerged: "Feelings aroused in the EMS", "Experiences in the daily routine", "nurses' activities in EMS", "Personal and professional preparedness", "Reflecting on the professional training" and "Nurses' perceptions of the EMS".

Author(s): 
Romanzini, Ev‚nio M·rcio
Bock, LisnÈia Fabiani

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Nurses