Nurses

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the attitudes and practices of professionals in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) regarding prayer and meditation. DESIGN: A national mail survey that included questions about the use of a number of complementary and alternative therapies. PARTICIPANTS: The survey was mailed to 7,479 physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and occupational therapists who specialize in PM&R, and 1221 (17%) returned completed surveys.

Author(s): 
Schoenberger, Nancy E.
Matheis, Robert J.
Shiflett, Samuel C.
Cotter, Ann C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Christian Nursing: A Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Author(s): 
Schlintz, V.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Nursing
Author(s): 
Gorman, Geraldine
Publication Title: 
BMC cancer

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the leading female malignancy in Nigeria. Screening for early detection has led to reduction in mortality from the disease. It is known that attitudes of physicians and motivation by community nurses influence uptake of screening methods by women. This study aims to investigate knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, beliefs about treatment and practice of screening methods among a cohort of female healthcare professionals in Lagos, Nigeria.

Author(s): 
Ibrahim, Nasiru A.
Odusanya, Olumuyiwa O.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Cancer Care

The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate registered nurses' coping processes when working with terminally ill and dying cancer patients, with special focus on religious aspects of coping resources. What religious components can be identified as coping resources in oncology nurses' orienting system and what function has religiosity in the nurse's work? The theoretical reference is care philosophy and the psychology of religion and coping. The material consists of interviews with 15 Swedish registered oncology nurses.

Author(s): 
Ekedahl, M. A.
Wengström, Y.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Most research on the impact of mind-body training does not ask about participants' baseline experience, expectations, or preferences for training. To better plan participant-centered mind-body intervention trials for nurses to reduce occupational stress, such descriptive information would be valuable. METHODS: We conducted an anonymous email survey between April and June, 2010 of North American nurses interested in mind-body training to reduce stress.

Author(s): 
Kemper, Kathi
Bulla, Sally
Krueger, Deborah
Ott, Mary Jane
McCool, Jane A.
Gardiner, Paula
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Although many health care professionals (HCPs) in the United States have been educated about and recommend dietary supplements, little is known about their personal use of dietary supplements and factors associated with their use. METHODS: We surveyed HCPs at the point of their enrollment in an on-line course about dietary supplements between September, 2004 and May, 2005. We used multivariable logistic regression to analyze demographic and practice factors associated with use of dietary supplements.

Author(s): 
Gardiner, Paula
Woods, Charles
Kemper, Kathi J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

The authors surveyed 191 allopathic physicians (MDs), registered nurses (RNs), and allied health professionals (AHPs) regarding their opinions toward osteopathic medicine and alternative therapies. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to these healthcare professionals practicing in a rural region of west-central Vermont. Participants responded to six questions concerning osteopathic medicine and 18 types of alternative therapies.

Author(s): 
McPartland, J. M.
Pruit, P. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
The Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing: A Quarterly Publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of massage therapy in reducing physiological and psychological indicators of stress in nurses employed in an acute care hospital. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Acute care hospital in Queensland. SUBJECTS: Sixty nurses were recruited to the five week study and randomly assigned to two groups. INTERVENTION: A 15 minute back massage once a week. The control group did not receive any therapy.

Author(s): 
Bost, Nerolie
Wallis, Marianne

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