Nursing Process

Publication Title: 
The Australian Journal of Holistic Nursing

In thinking through practice reflections Margi uses images and text to contemplate the form of conversation when spiritual/ elemental experience enables a person or family to reconnect the layers of their everyday world with the heart or centre of their being.

Author(s): 
Martin, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Child Health Care: For Professionals Working with Children in the Hospital and Community

This article reports one aspect of a phenomenological study that described the lived experience of mothering a child hospitalized with acute illness or injury. The significance for mothers that nurses do the 'little things' emerged in considering the implications of this study's findings for nurses in practice. Seven mothers whose child had been hospitalized in the 12 months prior to the first interview agreed to share their stories. The resulting data were analysed and interpreted using van Manen's interpretation of phenomenology.

Author(s): 
Gasquoine, Susan E.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Philosophy: An International Journal for Healthcare Professionals

The discipline of nursing is still struggling with the differences that need to be clearly defined between the notions of care and nursing care. To be able to clarify this distinction, agreement must first be reached on the meaning of care itself. The present article proposes a conception of care in light of the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995). This philosopher's thought throws considerable light on the ontology of care, thanks especially to his focus on the deeper implications of human encounter.

Author(s): 
Lavoie, Mireille
De Koninck, Thomas
Blondeau, Danielle
Publication Title: 
Journal of Holistic Nursing: Official Journal of the American Holistic Nurses' Association

Meeting the many needs of a young adolescent on a busy Saturday can be quite a challenge. This article shows how a nurse practitioner drew on Watson's theory of caring as the basis of her interaction with an 11-year-old boy and his mother and relied on her ability to be flexible and creative in the process. The positive outcomes of this visit were evident in the client's and mother's change of affect and their commitment to take positive action.

Author(s): 
Bollinger, E.
Publication Title: 
Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice

This essay briefly examines some of the cross-cultural challenges that faced nurses in the Philippines, India, and South Africa in the context of 19th and 20th century imperialism. During this time, nurses from colonizing countries served as agents of empire by helping to establish and reinforce American and European control in colonized societies. In doing so, they sought to instill the racial and gender hierarchies of their home countries in the colonial territories.

Author(s): 
Schultheiss, Katrin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

Pranayama' or yogic breathing as a method of re-expansion of lungs in patients with pleural effusion was studied. Ten patients with pleural effusion practised alternate nostril breathing for 20 days after aspiration of fluid. An equal number matched for age and smoking habits underwent routine physiotherapy of the hospital for the same period. Lung function was measured: before aspiration; immediately after aspiration; and, 5, 10, 15 and 20 days after aspiration. The FVC, FEV1, MVV, PEFR, CE and RS, were used to measure lung function.

Author(s): 
Prakasamma, M.
Bhaduri, A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM: This paper reports the development of a substantive theory to explain the process parish nurses use to provide spiritual care to parishioners in Christian churches in a context where patients and nurses share a common set of values. BACKGROUND: Despite a surge of interest in spirituality and spiritual care in nursing, consensus is lacking on how care should be conceptualized and provided. METHOD: Grounded theory method was used to explore and describe the processes 10 American parish nurses experienced and used as they gave spiritual care. Data were collected between 1998 and 2001.

Author(s): 
van Dover, Leslie
Pfeiffer, Jane Bacon
Publication Title: 
The Nursing Clinics of North America

Each of the nurses in these examples demonstrates an understanding of patient advocacy. Patient advocacy may involve the nurse in political action or negotiation for change. Perhaps more frequently, however, it is a quiet, private function of support and intuition as patients (or clients) seek to come to a personal awareness of the meaning of illness. Advocacy exhibits a sensitivity to personal values, hopes, and even unspoken prayer that shape an atmosphere of caring. Patient advocacy enhances all that is life giving.

Author(s): 
Salladay, S. A.
McDonnell, M. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to share reflectively how my empirical studies on spirituality and culture have had an impact upon nurse education. BACKGROUND: Spirituality and cultural dimensions of care are considered to be integral to holistic care. The healing potentials of spiritual and cultural care are well documented. The commitment to the research programme came due to the concern within early literature on nursing that the provision of spiritual care for patients is inadequate.

Author(s): 
Narayanasamy, Aru
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Oncology Nursing: The Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society

Little is known about relationships between quality of care (QoC) and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among patients with lung cancer (LC). PURPOSE: This study examines CAM-use among patients with LC in Sweden, associations between QoC and CAM-use among these patients, and reported aspects of LC-care perceived as particularly positive and negative by patients, as well as suggestions for improving QoC.

Author(s): 
Lövgren, M.
Wilde-Larsson, B.
Hök, J.
Leveälahti, H.
Tishelman, C.

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