Nutritional Requirements

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Our objective in this study was to estimate calcium intakes from food, water, dietary supplements, and antacids for U.S. citizens aged >or=1 y using NHANES 2003-2006 data and the Dietary Reference Intake panel age groupings. Similar estimates were calculated for vitamin D intake from food and dietary supplements using NHANES 2005-2006. Diet was assessed with 2 24-h recalls; dietary supplement and antacid use were determined by questionnaire. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate usual nutrient intake from dietary sources.

Author(s): 
Bailey, Regan L.
Dodd, Kevin W.
Goldman, Joseph A.
Gahche, Jaime J.
Dwyer, Johanna T.
Moshfegh, Alanna J.
Sempos, Christopher T.
Picciano, Mary Frances
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

BACKGROUND: The intake of selenium needed for optimal health has not been established. Selenoproteins perform the functions of selenium, and the selenium intake needed for their full expression is not known. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to determine the intake of selenium required to optimize plasma selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and to compare SEPP1 with other plasma selenium biomarkers. DESIGN: A 40-wk placebo-controlled, double-blind study of selenium repletion was carried out in 98 healthy Chinese subjects who had a daily dietary selenium intake of 14 micro g.

Author(s): 
Xia, Yiming
Hill, Kristina E.
Li, Ping
Xu, Jiayuan
Zhou, Dingyou
Motley, Amy K.
Wang, Li
Byrne, Daniel W.
Burk, Raymond F.
Publication Title: 
Evidence Report/Technology Assessment

BACKGROUND: Since the 1997 Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) values for vitamin D and calcium were established new data have become available on their relationship, both individually and combined, to a wide range of health outcomes. The Institute of Medicine/Food and Nutrition Board has constituted a DRI committee to undertake a review of the evidence and potential revision of the current DRI values for these nutrients.

Author(s): 
Chung, Mei
Balk, Ethan M.
Brendel, Michael
Ip, Stanley
Lau, Joseph
Lee, Jounghee
Lichtenstein, Alice
Patel, Kamal
Raman, Gowri
Tatsioni, Athina
Terasawa, Teruhiko
Trikalinos, Thomas A.
Publication Title: 
Nutrients

The role of calcium in the prevention of bone loss in later life has been well established but little data exist on the adequacy of calcium intakes in elderly Australian women. The aim of this study was to compare the dietary intake including calcium of elderly Australian women with the Australian dietary recommendation, and to investigate the prevalence of calcium supplement use in this population. Community-dwelling women aged 70-80 years were randomly recruited using the Electoral Roll for a 2-year protein intervention study in Western Australia.

Author(s): 
Meng, Xingqiong
Kerr, Deborah A.
Zhu, Kun
Devine, Amanda
Solah, Vicky
Binns, Colin W.
Prince, Richard L.
Publication Title: 
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition

This study describes dietary supplement consumption practices among the Taiwanese population over the age of 65. Data for the analyses were derived from the 2005-2008 Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan. Data from a total of 914 participants (456 men and 458 women) was collected in the study to delineate patterns of supplement usage. The results indicated that the percentage of individuals taking supplements was 45.7% for men and 52.2% for women.

Author(s): 
Chen, Shih-Ying
Lin, Jia-Rong
Chen, Tzu-Hsiu
Guo, Shiou-Guei
Kao, Mei-Ding
Pan, Wen-Harn
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

BACKGROUND: Dietary supplement use is extensive in US adults. Some reports suggested that supplement users had higher nutrient intakes from the diet than did nonusers, but to our knowledge this finding has not been examined in nationally representative survey data. OBJECTIVE: In this analysis, we examined mineral intakes from the diet by supplement-use categories and how these supplements contributed to meeting or exceeding Dietary Reference Intakes for selected minerals.

Author(s): 
Bailey, Regan L.
Fulgoni, Victor L.
Keast, Debra R.
Dwyer, Johanna T.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

This article is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of dietary methods for treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) when pharmacotherapy has proven unsatisfactory or unacceptable. Results of recent research and controlled studies, based on a PubMed search, are emphasized and compared with earlier reports. The recent increase of interest in this form of therapy for ADHD, and especially in the use of omega supplements, significance of iron deficiency, and the avoidance of the "Western pattern" diet, make the discussion timely.

Author(s): 
Millichap, J. Gordon
Yee, Michelle M.
Publication Title: 
Nutrients

The use of complementary and alternative medicines including dietary supplements, herbals and special diets to prevent or treat disease continues to be popular. The following paper provides a description of an alternative dietary approach to the self-management and treatment of cancer, the Bill Henderson Protocol (BHP). This diet encourages daily intake of raw foods, a combination of cottage cheese and flaxseed oil and a number of supplements. Some foods and food groups are restricted (e.g., gluten, meat, dairy).

Author(s): 
Mannion, Cynthia
Page, Stacey
Bell, Laurie Heilman
Verhoef, Marja
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: To examine if children use supplements to fill gaps in nutritionally inadequate diets or whether supplements contribute to already adequate or excessive micronutrient intakes from foods. STUDY DESIGN: Data were analyzed for children (2-18 years) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey (n = 7250). Diet was assessed using two 24-hour recalls, and dietary supplement use was assessed with a 30-day questionnaire. RESULTS: Prevalence of supplements use was 21% (<2 years) and 42% (2-8 years).

Author(s): 
Bailey, Regan L.
Fulgoni, Victor L.
Keast, Debra R.
Lentino, Cindy V.
Dwyer, Johanna T.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Based on recent research, an upper limit of safe intake (ULSI) for leucine is proposed for healthy adults: 0.53 g/(kg·d). Because leucine has been used as a dietary supplement for many years in people practicing exercise and sport, further study with long-term exposure to leucine in this specific subpopulation should be performed to eventually adjust the ULSI.

Author(s): 
Cynober, Luc
Bier, Dennis M.
Kadowaki, Motoni
Morris, Sidney M.
Renwick, Andrew G.

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