Nutritional Sciences

Publication Title: 
Physiology & Behavior

The focus of this review is on current research involving long-term calorie restriction (CR) and the resulting changes observed in physiological and behavioral outcomes in humans. Special emphasis will be given to the first completed clinical studies which are currently investigating the effects of controlled, high-quality energy-restricted diets on both biomarkers of longevity and on the development of chronic diseases related to age in humans.

Author(s): 
Redman, Leanne M.
Martin, Corby K.
Williamson, Donald A.
Ravussin, Eric
Publication Title: 
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Author(s): 
Macdonald, I.
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

During recent decades, the concept of health promotion has become a legitimate part of health care because of the aging of the postwar baby boom generation. As this population ages, the potential strain on health care systems will increase because the greatest use of health care services occurs during the last years of life. In older adults there are many correctable health factors that can be assessed through screening protocols.

Author(s): 
Chernoff, R.
Publication Title: 
Presse MÈdicale (Paris, France: 1983)

Calorie restriction increases longevity in rodents, delays the onset of certain diseases and has positive effects on ageing. Studies are ongoing in non-human primates. Eight persons following such a diet for 2 years reacted as anticipated (loss of body weight and fat, decrease in glycaemia and body temperature, etc.). Calorie restriction perhaps teaches us more on the means of resisting malnutrition than on ageing in normal dietary conditions. Calorie restriction is a tool for research, but it should not be recommended by practitioners, notably in elderly patients.

Author(s): 
Le Bourg, Eric
Publication Title: 
Rejuvenation Research

Optimal nutrition is essential for general well being, maintenance of physical and functional capacities and prevention of chronic disease in the elderly. The 5-year longitudinal study, NuAge, was designed to assess the pivotal role of nutrition on physical and cognitive status, functional autonomy and social functioning. A cohort of 1793 men and women, selected from three age groups (68-72, 73-77, 78-82) at recruitment, has been followed annually since 2003-2004. A plurimethodological approach, including basic, clinical, epidemiologic, and social research has been used.

Author(s): 
Gaudreau, Pierrette
Morais, JosÈ A.
Shatenstein, Bryna
Gray-Donald, Katherine
Khalil, Abdel
Dionne, Isabelle
Ferland, Guylaine
F¸lˆp, Tam‡s
Jacques, Danielle
Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne
Tessier, Daniel
Wagner, Richard
Payette, Hélène
Publication Title: 
Physiology & Behavior

The focus of this review is on current research involving long-term calorie restriction (CR) and the resulting changes observed in physiological and behavioral outcomes in humans. Special emphasis will be given to the first completed clinical studies which are currently investigating the effects of controlled, high-quality energy-restricted diets on both biomarkers of longevity and on the development of chronic diseases related to age in humans.

Author(s): 
Redman, Leanne M.
Martin, Corby K.
Williamson, Donald A.
Ravussin, Eric
Publication Title: 
Primary Care

What are the best dietary practices and farming methods to promote health? The answer may depend on whether one looks at the health of individuals or the health of the planet (planetary health or PH). PH will equate to a healthy ecosphere fostered by dietary/farming practices that are less resource-intense, potentially decreasing starvation and carbon emissions. Best practices also may depend on whether by health one means lack of observable disease (such as obesity, nutritional deficiency, diabetes, or cancer), optimal health (also known as wellness), or longevity.

Author(s): 
Chahbazi, John
Grow, Shelly
Publication Title: 
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences

Since the 1930s scientists from fields such as biochemistry, pathology, immunology, genetics, neuroscience, and nutrition have studied the relation of dietary caloric intake to longevity and aging. This paper discusses how Clive Maine McCay, a professor of animal husbandry at Cornell University, began his investigation of the topic and promoted it as a productive research program in the multidisciplinary science of gerontology.

Author(s): 
Park, Hyung Wook
Publication Title: 
Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.)

The United States population is aging rapidly, and understanding the potential impact and feasibility of lifestyle interventions on the aging process is of central importance for addressing future population health and health care costs.

Author(s): 
Roberts, Susan B.
Speakman, John
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Wendell Griffith made an indelible impression on his students, his colleagues and the broad field of the nutrition sciences. He was the prototype of the physiological chemist studying intricate problems of intermediary metabolism in the whole animal or human body. His early scientific reports on choline and amino acid metabolism set a high standard for intellectual precision and literary clarity. Dr. Griffith's last research paper was entitled "The Present Knowledge of Methyl Groups in Nutrition" and appeared in Nutrition Reviews in 1968.

Author(s): 
Olson, R. E.

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