Nutritional Support

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Dysphagia (swallowing problems) are common after stroke and can cause chest infection and malnutrition. Dysphagic, and malnourished, stroke patients have a poorer outcome. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions for the treatment of dysphagia (swallowing therapy), and nutritional and fluid supplementation, in patients with acute and subacute (within six months from onset) stroke.

Author(s): 
Geeganage, Chamila
Beavan, Jessica
Ellender, Sharon
Bath, Philip M. W.
Publication Title: 
Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics

Overeating and obesity are major health problems even in the elderly since they lead to the metabolic syndrome, resulting in an increase in cardiovascular disease. The development of novel nutritional therapeutics for the purpose of promoting health and controlling ageing process aims at the self-helping elderly. Caloric restriction (CR) has been widely investigated as a powerful method that can prevent and reverse senescent changes. CR might counteract the deleterious aspects of metabolic syndrome and may prolong lifespan even in humans.

Author(s): 
Shinmura, Ken
Publication Title: 
NeuroRehabilitation

A wide range of medical, legal and ethical opinion regarding withholding or withdrawing medically assisted nutrition and hydration (ANH) from vegetative state (VS) and persistent vegetative state patients (PVS) has been presented in professional journals over the past twenty years. This article concerns the moral aspects of this debate as it has developed within the Catholic Church, especially in the United States.

Author(s): 
McMahon, Kevin T.
Publication Title: 
Issues in Law & Medicine

On March 20, 2004, Pope John Paul II issued a statement to the International Conference on "Life Sustaining Treatments and Vegetative State: Scientific and Ethical Dilemmas" on the provision of food and water to patients in a "vegetative state." The purpose of this allocution was to promote and protect the dignity of patients, even when they are in a seriously ill and disabled state. To promote the dignity of these patients, the Pope explicitly stated that "quality of life judgments" were not to be applied to the administration of nutrition and fluids.

Author(s): 
Barry, Robert
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This article discusses the unexpectedly firm stance professed by John Paul II on the provision of artificial nutrition and hydration to patients who are in a persistent vegetative state, and it implications on previously held standards of judging medical treatments. The traditional ordinary/extraordinary care distinction is assessed in light of complexities of the recent allocution as well as its impact on Catholic individuals and in Catholic health care facilities.

Author(s): 
Shannon, Thomas A.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This essay reviews the Roman Catholic moral tradition surrounding treatments at the end of life together with the challenges presented to that tradition by the Texas Advance Directives Act. The impact on Catholic health care facilities and physicians, and the way in which the moral tradition should be applied under this statute, particularly with reference to the provision dealing with conflicts over end-of-life treatments, will be critically assessed.

Author(s): 
Zientek, David M.
Publication Title: 
HEC forum: an interdisciplinary journal on hospitals' ethical and legal issues

Roman Catholics have a long tradition of evaluating medical treatment at the end of life to determine if proposed interventions are proportionate and morally obligatory or disproportionate and morally optional. There has been significant debate within the Catholic community about whether artificially delivered nutrition and hydration can be appreciated as a medical intervention that may be optional in some situations, or if it should be treated as essentially obligatory in all circumstances.

Author(s): 
Zientek, David M.
Publication Title: 
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America

Compromised nutrition leading to weight loss is a common and significant problem in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient population. The benefit of aggressive and early nutritional therapy can profoundly influence the disease course, quality of life, and survival. This article reviews the role of nutrition, both as sustenance and treatment for patients who have ALS. Self-medication with dietary supplements has become increasingly popular within this patient population.

Author(s): 
Rosenfeld, Jeffrey
Ellis, Amy
Publication Title: 
Nutrición Hospitalaria

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The beneficial effect of eicosapentaenoic acid in cancer patients is widely described especially in relation to its role in tumour cachexia. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of administration of a new oral powder supplement enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid compared to a standard liquid supplement in cancer patients.

Author(s): 
Gómez-Candela, C.
Villarino Sanz, M.
Horrisberger, A.
Loria Kohen, V.
Bermejo, L. M.
Zamora Auñón, P.
Publication Title: 
World journal of gastroenterology: WJG

The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease.

Author(s): 
Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard
Irtun, Oivind
Olesen, Søren Schou
Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr
Holst, Mette

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Nutritional Support