Observation

Publication Title: 
Psychological Assessment

Improvements in stable, or dispositional, mindfulness are often assumed to accrue from mindfulness training and to account for many of its beneficial effects. However, research examining these assumptions has produced mixed findings, and the relation between dispositional mindfulness and mindfulness training is actively debated.

Author(s): 
Quaglia, Jordan T.
Braun, Sarah E.
Freeman, Sara P.
McDaniel, Michael A.
Brown, Kirk Warren
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

As a therapeutic intervention, homeopathy is the target of increased scepticism because in the main, its remedies are diluted and succussed (potentized) out of material existence. This puts homeopathy seemingly at odds with the paradigm of conventional science, in particular, that atoms and molecules are the fundamental building blocks of all matter. Accordingly, homeopathy cannot work, so that any reported beneficial effects must, at best, be due to the placebo effect.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, Lionel R.
Publication Title: 
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine

Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has become important, particularly because it is widely used. This article outlines CAM's position between evidence and absurdity. It discusses misconceptions that often mislead the public and shows how CAM can and should be submitted to the principles of evidence- based medicine (EBM). Employing the example of acupuncture, the evidence as it currently stands is described. But there are numerous obstacles to applying EBM to CAM. EBM is defenseless against absurdity.

Author(s): 
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that the random assignment of participants does not cause harm to patients in clinical trials. However, in a recent study, patient preference affected the health outcome of the patients. It can therefore be assumed that patients who are allocated at random may be affected by placebo effects that are associated with the treatment of their choice. The aim of this study was to determine whether random participant assignment in acupuncture trials causes fewer benefits to the participants.

Author(s): 
Koog, Yun Hyung
Min, Byung-Il
Publication Title: 
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine

Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has become important, particularly because it is widely used. This article outlines CAM's position between evidence and absurdity. It discusses misconceptions that often mislead the public and shows how CAM can and should be submitted to the principles of evidence- based medicine (EBM). Employing the example of acupuncture, the evidence as it currently stands is described. But there are numerous obstacles to applying EBM to CAM. EBM is defenseless against absurdity.

Author(s): 
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that the random assignment of participants does not cause harm to patients in clinical trials. However, in a recent study, patient preference affected the health outcome of the patients. It can therefore be assumed that patients who are allocated at random may be affected by placebo effects that are associated with the treatment of their choice. The aim of this study was to determine whether random participant assignment in acupuncture trials causes fewer benefits to the participants.

Author(s): 
Koog, Yun Hyung
Min, Byung-Il
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

Sexual violence within as well as outside sexual relationships has far-reaching public health and human rights implications and is a continuing focus of popular debate, media coverage, and research in postapartheid South Africa. Partly because it has been shown to affect individual vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, sexual violence has in recent years become framed as a global public health issue.

Author(s): 
Wood, Kate
Lambert, Helen
Jewkes, Rachel
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Neuroscience documents the activity of "mirror neurons" in the human brain as a mechanism whereby we experience empathy and recognize the intentions of others by observing their behavior and automatically matching their brain activity. This neural basis of empathy finds support in research on dysfunctions in the mirror systems of humans with autism and fMRI research on normal subjects designed to assess intentionality, emotions, and complex cognition.

Author(s): 
Rossi, Ernest L.
Rossi, Kathryn L.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) is a common distressful symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS) affecting quality of life. Yoga has been widely used in treating various symptoms of patients with MS. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of integrated Yoga for NBD in patients with MS as an adjunct to standard medical care. DESIGN: This open arm, pre-post study design assessed the outcome measures at base line and after 21 days of integrated Yoga intervention.

Author(s): 
Patil, N. J.
Nagaratna, R.
Garner, C.
Raghuram, N. V.
Crisan, R.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Because no current evidence-based guidelines for postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) discontinuation strategies exist, we compared female veterans who tapered HT to those who stopped abruptly with regard to patient-specific health factors and recurrence of menopausal symptoms. METHODS: We identified female veterans who used combined estrogen/medroxyprogesterone HT in 2001 using the VA Pharmacy Benefits Management database. We then randomly sorted and selected 4,000 women for a mailed invitation to participate in a HT survey.

Author(s): 
Haskell, Sally G.
Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne
Gordon, Kirsha

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