Organizational Culture

Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM: This paper reports a critical review of nursing organizational culture research studies with the objectives of: (1) reviewing theoretical and methodological characteristics of the studies and (2) drawing inferences specific to the state of knowledge in this field. BACKGROUND: Organizational culture is regarded as significant in influencing research use in clinical practice yet it is not understood how culture shapes practitioners' behaviours. Only one review of this empirical literature in nursing has been completed.

Author(s): 
Scott-Findlay, Shannon
Estabrooks, Carole A.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) is a major patient safety concern and is associated with morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. Prevention and control requires a multi-modal approach, but the individual's accountability and rigorous application of standard infection prevention and control behaviours is at its core. The third instalment of the epic3 guidance ( Loveday et al, 2014a ) provided the evidence and advanced the importance of hand-hygiene behaviour, the use of non-sterile gloves and environmental cleanliness.

Author(s): 
Cole, Mark
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Recent research has demonstrated a clear link between spirituality and health, but it remains a challenge for many organizations to weave spirituality into organizational life and make it an integral component of clinical care. Three dimensions of spirituality work together in healthcare: spiritual well-being of patients and families, spiritual well-being of workers, and spiritual well-being of the organization. To cultivate these dimensions in the life of healthcare organizations, several strategies may be employed. First, the definition of "spirituality" must be clear.

Author(s): 
Craigie, F. C.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Catholic healthcare should establish comprehensive compliance strategies, beyond following Medicare reimbursement laws, that reflect mission and ethics. A covenant model of business ethics--rather than a self-interest emphasis on contracts--can help organizations develop a creed to focus on obligations and trust in their relationships. The corporate integrity program (CIP) of Mercy Health System Oklahoma promotes its mission and interests, educates and motivates its employees, provides assurance of systemwide commitment, and enforces CIP policies and procedures.

Author(s): 
Tuohey, J. F.
Publication Title: 
Seminars for Nurse Managers

This article is about the blending of a mission, vision, and philosophy of care by two systems of health care that are both rich in history and vision. The unique qualities of each hospital are described. The diversified cultures of each organization are discussed in terms of reaching a final decision regarding the joint vision, philosophy of care, and mission of the system that has been redesigned.

Author(s): 
Young, J.
Publication Title: 
Modern Healthcare

Christus Health has bucked the trend by looking to Mexico for expansion. The Roman Catholic system based in Irving, Texas, bought 51% of Hospital Muquerza in the prosperous northern Mexico state of Nuevo Leon. Christus believes the move makes sense on many levels.

Author(s): 
Jaklevic, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Catholic hospitals seek to offer health care in accord with the example of Christ. They have several models to assist in this effort. The first model is the values portrayed in the Gospels. The Catholic Church has sought to embody these Gospel values in specific teachings. These teachings have been further specified for hospitals in the United States by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops in the Ethical and Religious Directives. Finally, the Gospels values are also expressed for individual Catholic health care systems in mission statements and statements of Catholic identity.

Author(s): 
O'Rourke, K.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This article examines the current use of Jesus language in a convenience sample of twenty-five mission statements from Roman Catholic hospitals and health care systems in the United States. Only twelve statements specifically use the words "Jesus" or "Christ" in their mission statements. The author advocates the use of explicit Jesus language and modeling.

Author(s): 
Taylor, C.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Organizational ethics refers to the integration of values into decision making, policies, and behavior throughout the multi-disciplinary environment of a health care organization. Based upon Catholic social ethics, stewardship is at the heart of organizational ethics in health care in this sense: stewardship provides the hermeneutic filter that enables basic ethical principles to be realized practically, within the context of the Catholic theology of work, to concerns in health care.

Author(s): 
Magill, G.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Issues of institutional identity and integrity in Roman Catholic health care institutions have been addressed at the level of individual institutions as well as by organizations of Catholic health care providers and at various levels in the Church hierarchy. The papers by Carol Taylor, C.S.F.N., Thomas Shannon, Kevin O'Rourke, O.P., Gerard Magill in this volume provide a significant contribution to concerns of Roman Catholic health care institutions as they face the challenges of providing health care in a secular, pluralistic, market-driven economy.

Author(s): 
Iltis, A. S.

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