Organizational Objectives

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nursing Administration

Building a sustainable evidence-based practice (EBP) infrastructure during times of financial constraints poses challenges for nurse leaders. To be successful, plans need to be creative and adaptive, while mindful of limited resources. This commentary describes change management strategies used to implement an EBP infrastructure at a hospital after organizational restructuring occurred.

Author(s): 
Beck, Mary S.
Staffileno, Beth A.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Catholic healthcare's mission is keeping people healthy, and providers must listen closely to determine their needs in these fast-paced, stressful times. In a society preoccupied with technology and acute care, which has the least overall impact on people's health, providers must implement more preventive strategies. The shift to promoting community health will require diverse, creative approaches. Catholic facilities must offer holistic healing, becoming community resources for children and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Ryan, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The three original founding healthcare systems and 10 sponsoring religious institutes of Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI) have developed an unprecedented governance model to support their vision of a national Catholic health ministry in the twenty-first century. The new organization spans 22 states; annual revenues exceed $4.7 billion. Religious institutes choose either active or honorary status before consolidating with CHI, depending on their desired involvement in the organization. Currently, nine are active and two are honorary.

Author(s): 
Poe, J. E.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Convinced that Catholic organizations might have special strengths for succeeding in price-competitive markets, the Catholic Health Association, with the assistance of a national membership advisory committee and The Lewin Group, Fairfax, VA, studied six healthcare organizations that are successfully meeting the challenges of difficult environments. Based on more than 100 interviews and assessments of the environments in which these progressive mission-driven organizations operate, the researchers identified strategies that can assist other faith-based health organizations.

Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In 1988, with the publication of Catholic Health Ministry: A New Vision for a New Century, the Commission on Catholic Health Care Ministry called on the Church to redefine its healing mission in society. Unfortunately, despite various efforts, the Church has not yet fully articulated a shared vision of Catholic healthcare, healing, and support. Healing human brokenness has always been the Church's work in the world, whether the brokenness be physical, emotional, intellectual, moral, or spiritual.

Author(s): 
Fahey, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Hospitals & Health Networks

Religious groups have laid thousands of hospital cornerstones, but today's business bent is forcing hard choices about how best to minister to the poor and sick. Hospitals owned by religious communities are both numerous and endangered, with as many as half expected to change hands.

Author(s): 
Bilchik, G. S.
Publication Title: 
Inquiry: A Journal of Medical Care Organization, Provision and Financing

Catholic hospitals maintain a significant presence in delivering hospital services in the United States, but little is known about the ways they differ from other ownership forms in similar market environments. This paper analyzes characteristics of Catholic, other private nonprofit, and investor-owned hospitals in metropolitan areas of the United States to identify the extent to which Catholic hospitals differ from other ownership types on three dimensions of mission-driven identity--access, stigmatized, and compassionate care services.

Author(s): 
White, K. R.
Begun, J. W.
Publication Title: 
Seminars for Nurse Managers

This article is about the blending of a mission, vision, and philosophy of care by two systems of health care that are both rich in history and vision. The unique qualities of each hospital are described. The diversified cultures of each organization are discussed in terms of reaching a final decision regarding the joint vision, philosophy of care, and mission of the system that has been redesigned.

Author(s): 
Young, J.
Publication Title: 
Profiles in Healthcare Marketing

Daniel Freeman Hospitals in in Los Angeles committed $11.2 million to its community benefits program, which includes charitable care, reimbursement shortfalls, outreach and community service programs. The Catholic hospitals are part of the Carondelet Health System. Their mission follows the example of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet who, in France in 1600, departed from the cloistered community life to go beyond the convent and care to people in their local communities.

Author(s): 
Rees, T.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Health Law

Professor Singer and Ms. Johnson Lantz provide a cogent overview of Catholic health care in the United States and address the key issues affecting Catholic health care in the coming years. In particular, (1) clarity in canonical and ethical interpretation; (2) industry consolidation; and (3) "next generation" sponsorship and the impact of these issues are discussed in detail. The authors conclude that successful Catholic health care organizations must maintain strong mission and business fundamentals in an increasingly competitive reimbursement and regulatory environment.

Author(s): 
Singer, L. E.
Lantz, E. J.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Organizational Objectives