Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

The relationship between hypnotizability and clinical improvement following brief psychotherapy was investigated. Prior to treatment 32 patients were assessed for hypnotizability utilizing an objective standardized measure of hypnotizability. Measures of psychopathology were obtained at the conclusion of ten sessions and six months post-treatment. A positive relationship was found between outcome and hypnotizability. This was most pronounced at the conclusion of ten sessions. Use of hypnotic techniques as a therapeutic adjunct did not necessarily lead to greater therapeutic effects.

Author(s): 
Nace, E. P.
Warwick, A. M.
Kelley, R. L.
Evans, F. J.
Publication Title: 
Patient Education and Counseling

Techniques developed over the last 30 years for preparing patients for surgical procedures include supplying information, cognitive coping strategies, relaxation and hypnosis, reassurance and support, and rehearsal. Intending to provide a practical guide for health-care practitioners, the author reviews research on the efficacy of these methods and on comparisons between methods and makes recommendations for further studies.

Author(s): 
Cochran, T. M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

Hypnosis has been described anecdotally to be effective in the treatment of sleepwalking and sleep terror, potentially dangerous parasomnias. The authors report the use of hypnosis in the treatment of 27 adult patients with these disorders. A total of 74% of these individuals reported much or very much improvement when followed over substantial periods after instruction in self-hypnotic exercises that were practiced in the home. Hypnosis, often preferred over pharmacotherapy by patients, required one to six office visits (mean = 1.6).

Author(s): 
Hurwitz, T. D.
Mahowald, M. W.
Schenck, C. H.
Schluter, J. L.
Bundlie, S. R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

In this paper we review the possibilities and limitations of hypnotherapeutic techniques in the treatment of obesity. In spite of some promising reports, the findings and opinions about the effectiveness of hypnosis in the treatment of obesity vary greatly. We provide a brief overview of specific hypnotherapeutic techniques--such as teaching relaxation, increasing self-control, encouraging physical exercise, altering self-esteem and body image, strengthening motivation, and exploring ambivalence for change--that can be involved in a multidimensional approach to obesity.

Author(s): 
Vanderlinden, J.
Vandereycken, W.
Publication Title: 
Children's Health Care: Journal of the Association for the Care of Children's Health

Hypnosis and cognitive-behavioral packages are effective in preparing pediatric oncology patients for bone marrow aspiration and lumbar puncture. However, the relative efficacy of different preparations has not been determined, and potent components of preparation packages have yet to be identified. Further, factors hypothesized to moderate effectiveness of preparation (e.g., cognitive development) have not been investigated.

Author(s): 
Rape, R. N.
Bush, J. P.
Publication Title: 
ASDC journal of dentistry for children

We report on the use of informal hypnotic imagery in a group of children who were unable to accept dental extractions under inhalation sedation and local anesthesia. Over the last two and a half years, one hundred and seventy-nine children have been seen in a sedation clinic at Newcastle Dental Hospital. In thirty-four cases it was necessary to stop treatment and from this group, twenty children were selected for the use of hypnotic imagery.

Author(s): 
Shaw, A. J.
Welbury, R. R.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

Hypnosis has been demonstrated to reduce analogue pain, and studies on the mechanisms of laboratory pain reduction have provided useful applications to clinical populations. Studies showing central nervous system activity during hypnotic procedures offer preliminary information concerning possible physiological mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia. Randomized controlled studies with clinical populations indicate that hypnosis has a reliable and significant impact on acute procedural pain and chronic pain conditions.

Author(s): 
Patterson, David R.
Jensen, Mark P.
Publication Title: 
The journal of nursing research: JNR

Infertility and its treatment may cause life crises in infertile women. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a crisis intervention program on improving psychosocial responses and enhancing coping strategies for infertile women attending different stages of an In-Vitro Fertilization V Embryo Transfer (IVF-ET) treatment program. Using an experimental study design, infertile women attending an IVF-ET treatment program were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups.

Author(s): 
Shu-Hsin, Lee
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

The purpose of this study was to determine whether an Ericksonian approach to therapy using hypnosis (ET) was as effective as brief dynamic therapy (BDT), a long-standing and well-researched form of psychotherapy. The study used a comparative pretest/posttest design with four paper and pencil tests [Clark Personal and Social Adjustment Scale (CPSAS), Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL), Target Complaint (TC), and Global Improvement (GI)] and six therapy sessions.

Author(s): 
Simpkins, C. Alexander
Simpkins, Annellen M.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Hypnosis is attempting to come to grips with the EST (Empirically Supported Therapy) revolution in mental health practice. However, there are ways to account for outcome outside of simple empirical validation of treatment models. In this light, strategic eclecticism as a broader research-based consideration is used to illustrate empirical principles within Eriksonian hypnotherapeutic approaches.

Author(s): 
Amundson, Jon K.
Nuttgens, Simon A.

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