Ownership

Publication Title: 
Hospitals & Health Networks

Religious groups have laid thousands of hospital cornerstones, but today's business bent is forcing hard choices about how best to minister to the poor and sick. Hospitals owned by religious communities are both numerous and endangered, with as many as half expected to change hands.

Author(s): 
Bilchik, G. S.
Publication Title: 
Inquiry: A Journal of Medical Care Organization, Provision and Financing

Catholic hospitals maintain a significant presence in delivering hospital services in the United States, but little is known about the ways they differ from other ownership forms in similar market environments. This paper analyzes characteristics of Catholic, other private nonprofit, and investor-owned hospitals in metropolitan areas of the United States to identify the extent to which Catholic hospitals differ from other ownership types on three dimensions of mission-driven identity--access, stigmatized, and compassionate care services.

Author(s): 
White, K. R.
Begun, J. W.
Publication Title: 
Modern Healthcare

A young megasystem is charting new territory in Catholic healthcare because of its size, its ownership structure, which gives laity a more prominent role, and its enviable bottom line. But Denver-based Catholic Health Initiatives' many new ventures raise questions about the future: Will CHI become an acquisition-monger? Will it be able to maintain its strong Catholic ministry?

Author(s): 
Bellardi, D.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Health Law

Professor Singer and Ms. Johnson Lantz provide a cogent overview of Catholic health care in the United States and address the key issues affecting Catholic health care in the coming years. In particular, (1) clarity in canonical and ethical interpretation; (2) industry consolidation; and (3) "next generation" sponsorship and the impact of these issues are discussed in detail. The authors conclude that successful Catholic health care organizations must maintain strong mission and business fundamentals in an increasingly competitive reimbursement and regulatory environment.

Author(s): 
Singer, L. E.
Lantz, E. J.
Publication Title: 
The Milbank Quarterly

For centuries, the Catholic Church has been a major social actor in the provision of health services, particularly health care delivered in hospitals. Through a confluence of powerful environmental forces at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the future of Catholic health care is threatened. Although Catholic hospitals are a separate case of private, nonprofit hospitals, they have experienced environmental pressures to become isomorphic with other hospital ownership types and, on some dimensions, they are equal.

Author(s): 
White, K. R.
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Religious discussion of human organs and tissues has concentrated largely on donation for therapeutic purposes. The retrieval and use of human tissue samples in diagnostic, research, and education contexts have, by contrast, received very little direct theological attention. Initially undertaken at the behest of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, this essay seeks to explore the theological and religious questions embedded in nontherapeutic use of human tissue.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Courtney S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Agricultural & Environmental Ethics

Patents for genetic material in the industrialized North have expanded significantly over the past twenty years, playing a crucial role in the current configuration of the agricultural biotechnology industries, and raising significant ethical issues. Patents have been claimed for genes, gene sequences, engineered crop species, and the technical processes to engineer them. Most critics have addressed the human and ecosystem health implications of genetically engineered crops, but these broad patents raise economic issues as well.

Author(s): 
Warner, K. D.
Publication Title: 
Health Care Management Review

BACKGROUND: Catholic hospitals and health systems comprise a substantial segment of nonprofit, mission-driven, health care services, with accountability to institutional pressures of the Roman Catholic Church as well as economic pressures for solvency. Values are the way in which the organization expresses its faith-based institutional identity, which may used to select services that represent those values.

Author(s): 
White, Kenneth R.
Chou, Tiang-Hong
Dandi, Roberto
Publication Title: 
Philosophy & Public Affairs

...A commercial surrogate mother is anyone who is paid money to bear a child for other people and terminate her parental rights, so that the others may raise the child as exclusively their own. The growth of commercial surrogacy has raised with new urgency a class of concerns regarding the proper scope of the market. Some critics have objected to commercial surrogacy on the ground that it improperly treats children and women's reproductive capacities as commodities. The prospect of reducing children to consumer durables and women to baby factories surely inspires revulsion.

Author(s): 
Anderson, Elizabeth S.
Publication Title: 
Inquiry: A Journal of Medical Care Organization, Provision and Financing

This paper examines the effect of changing state policy, such as Medicaid eligibility, payment generosity, and HMO enrollment on provision of hospital uncompensated care. Using national data from the American Hospital Association for the period 1990 through 1995, we find that not-for-profit and public hospitals' uncompensated care levels respond positively to Medicaid payment generosity, although the magnitude of the effect is small. Not-for-profit hospitals respond negatively to Medicaid HMO penetration.

Author(s): 
Davidoff, A. J.
LoSasso, A. T.
Bazzoli, G. J.
Zuckerman, S.

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