Oxidants

Publication Title: 
Molecules (Basel, Switzerland)

Terminalia chebula, native to Southeast Asia, is a popular medicinal plant in Ayurveda. It has been previously reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory efficacy. In this study, we aimed to investigate if fruit extract from T. chebula might protect neuronal cells against ischemia and related diseases by reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD-R) ischemia and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

Author(s): 
Gaire, Bhakta Prasad
Jamarkattel-Pandit, Nirmala
Lee, Donghun
Song, Jungbin
Kim, Ji Young
Park, Juyeon
Jung, Soyoung
Choi, Ho-Young
Kim, Hocheol
Publication Title: 
African journal of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines: AJTCAM

BACKGROUND: The present study compares the protective properties of aqueous extracts of six medicinal plants, Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula (black and yellow), Terminalia arjuna, Balsamodendron Mukul and Alium sativum against lipid per-oxidation in mice brain. METHODS: The antioxidant activities were analyzed by lipid per-oxidation assay, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay, total antioxidant activity and metal chelation.

Author(s): 
Khan, Asmatullah
Nazar, Halima
Sabir, Syed Mubashar
Irshad, Muhammad
Awan, Shahid Iqbal
Abbas, Rizwan
Akram, Muhammad
Khaliq, Abdul
Rocha, João Batista Texeira
Ahmad, Syed Dilnawaz
Malik, Farnaz
Publication Title: 
Ageing Research Reviews

Mitochondrial energy metabolism and mitochondrially-derived oxidants have, for many years, been recognized as central toward the effects of aging. A body of recent work has focused on the relationship between mitochondrial redox state, aging and dietary interventions that affect lifespan. These studies have uncovered mechanisms through which diet alters mitochondrial metabolism, in addition to determining how these changes affect oxidant generation, which in itself has an impact on mitochondrial function in aged animals.

Author(s): 
Cerqueira, Fernanda M.
Kowaltowski, Alicia J.
Publication Title: 
Free Radical Biology & Medicine

Steroid hormones exhibit diverse biological activities. Despite intensive studies on steroid function at the genomic level, their nongenomic actions remain an enigma. In this study, we investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in androgen-stimulated prostate cancer (PCa) cell proliferation. In androgen-treated PCa cells, increased cell growth and ROS production correlated with elevated p66Shc protein, an authentic oxidase. This growth stimulation was blocked by antioxidants.

Author(s): 
Veeramani, Suresh
Chou, Yu-Wei
Lin, Frank C.
Muniyan, Sakthivel
Lin, Fen-Fen
Kumar, Satyendra
Xie, Yan
Lele, Subodh M.
Tu, Yaping
Lin, Ming-Fong
Publication Title: 
Nature

Living in an oxygenated environment has required the evolution of effective cellular strategies to detect and detoxify metabolites of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species. Here we review evidence that the appropriate and inappropriate production of oxidants, together with the ability of organisms to respond to oxidative stress, is intricately connected to ageing and life span.

Author(s): 
Finkel, T.
Holbrook, N. J.
Publication Title: 
Rejuvenation Research

Optimal nutrition is essential for general well being, maintenance of physical and functional capacities and prevention of chronic disease in the elderly. The 5-year longitudinal study, NuAge, was designed to assess the pivotal role of nutrition on physical and cognitive status, functional autonomy and social functioning. A cohort of 1793 men and women, selected from three age groups (68-72, 73-77, 78-82) at recruitment, has been followed annually since 2003-2004. A plurimethodological approach, including basic, clinical, epidemiologic, and social research has been used.

Author(s): 
Gaudreau, Pierrette
Morais, JosÈ A.
Shatenstein, Bryna
Gray-Donald, Katherine
Khalil, Abdel
Dionne, Isabelle
Ferland, Guylaine
F¸lˆp, Tam‡s
Jacques, Danielle
Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne
Tessier, Daniel
Wagner, Richard
Payette, Hélène
Publication Title: 
Journal of Dentistry

OBJECTIVES: This double blind randomized clinical trial evaluated the longevity of the whitening effect (6-month follow-up) of two carbamide peroxide concentrations used in at-home vital bleaching. METHODS: Ninety-two volunteers with shade mean C1 or darker for the six maxillary anterior teeth were randomized into two balanced groups (n=46) according to bleaching agent concentration: 10% (CP10) or 16% (CP16) carbamide peroxide. Patients were instructed to use the whitening agent in a tray for 2h/day during 3 weeks.

Author(s): 
Meireles, S. S.
Heckmann, S. S.
Santos, I. S.
Della Bona, A.
Demarco, F. F.
Publication Title: 
Ageing Research Reviews

Mitochondrial energy metabolism and mitochondrially-derived oxidants have, for many years, been recognized as central toward the effects of aging. A body of recent work has focused on the relationship between mitochondrial redox state, aging and dietary interventions that affect lifespan. These studies have uncovered mechanisms through which diet alters mitochondrial metabolism, in addition to determining how these changes affect oxidant generation, which in itself has an impact on mitochondrial function in aged animals.

Author(s): 
Cerqueira, Fernanda M.
Kowaltowski, Alicia J.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common inherited human enzyme defect. This deficiency provides some protection from clinical malaria, but it can also cause haemolysis after administration of drugs with oxidant properties. METHODS: The safety of chlorproguanil-dapsone+artesunate (CD+A) and amodiaquine+sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ+SP) for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria was evaluated according to G6PD deficiency in a secondary analysis of an open-label, randomized clinical trial.

Author(s): 
Fanello, Caterina I.
Karema, Corine
Avellino, Pamela
Bancone, Germana
Uwimana, Aline
Lee, Sue J.
D'Alessandro, Umberto
Modiano, David
Publication Title: 
Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

Artemisinin exerts the antimalarial activity through activation by heme. The hemolysis in malaria results in the elevated levels of plasma heme which may affect the activity of artemisinin. We hypothesized that the extracellular heme would potentiate the antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Hemin (ferric heme) at the pathologic concentrations enhanced the activity of artemisinin against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and increased the levels of the lipid peroxidation products in the presence of artemisinin.

Author(s): 
Tangnitipong, Sunanta
Thaptimthong, Thitiporn
Srihirun, Sirada
Unchern, Supeenun
Kittikool, Dusadee
Udomsangpetch, Rachanee
Sibmooh, Nathawut

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