Oxygen Consumption

Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology

Twelve normal healthy volunteers (6 males and 6 females) undergoing yoga training for 90 days were studied for the effect of yoga on exercise tolerance. Their ages ranged from 18 to 28 years. The volunteers were taught only Pranayama for the first 20 days and later on yogic asanas were added. Sub-maximal exercise tolerance test was done on a motorized treadmill by using Balke's modified protocol, initially, after 20 days (Phase-I) and after 90 days of yoga training (Phase-II).

Author(s): 
Raju, P. S.
Kumar, K. A.
Reddy, S. S.
Madhavi, S.
Gnanakumari, K.
Bhaskaracharyulu, C.
Reddy, M. V.
Annapurna, N.
Reddy, M. E.
Girijakumari, D.
Publication Title: 
The Gerontologist

Data regarding perceived change were collected as part of a study of the effects of aerobic exercise training on psychological, cognitive, and physiological functioning among 101 healthy older adults. Subjects were assigned randomly to an aerobic exercise group, a yoga control group, or a waiting list group for 16 weeks, after which all subjects participated in aerobic exercise for another 16 weeks.

Author(s): 
Emery, C. F.
Blumenthal, J. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of up to 14 months of aerobic exercise on measures of bone density in older adults. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial with subjects assigned to either an aerobic exercise condition, non-aerobic yoga, or a wait list non-exercise control group for 4 months. Aerobic fitness and bone density were evaluated in all subjects at baseline (Time 1) and after 4 months (Time 2). A semi-crossover design was utilized with all subjects completing 4 months of aerobic exercise, followed by another evaluation (Time 3).

Author(s): 
Blumenthal, J. A.
Emery, C. F.
Madden, D. J.
Schniebolk, S.
Riddle, M. W.
Cobb, F. R.
Higginbotham, M.
Coleman, R. E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Gerontology

The purpose of this study was to determine the psychological, behavioral, and cognitive changes associated with up to 14 months of aerobic exercise training. For the first 4 months of the study, 101 older (greater than 60 years) men and women were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: Aerobic exercise, Yoga, or a Waiting List control group. Before and following the intervention, all subjects completed a comprehensive assessment battery, including measures of mood and cognitive functioning.

Author(s): 
Blumenthal, J. A.
Emery, C. F.
Madden, D. J.
Schniebolk, S.
Walsh-Riddle, M.
George, L. K.
McKee, D. C.
Higginbotham, M. B.
Cobb, F. R.
Coleman, R. E.
Publication Title: 
The Indian Journal of Medical Research

The effect of pranayama a controlled breathing practice, on exercise tests was studied in athletes in two phases; sub-maximal and maximal exercise tests. At the end of phase I (one year) both the groups (control and experimental) achieved significantly higher work rate and reduction in oxygen consumption per unit work. There was a significant reduction in blood lactate and an increase in P/L ratio in the experimental group, at rest.

Author(s): 
Raju, P. S.
Madhavi, S.
Prasad, K. V.
Reddy, M. V.
Reddy, M. E.
Sahay, B. K.
Murthy, K. J.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Clinical Investigation

It is unclear whether the age-associated reduction in baroreflex sensitivity is modifiable by exercise training. The effects of aerobic exercise training and yoga, a non-aerobic control intervention, on the baroreflex of elderly persons was determined. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by the alpha-index, at high frequency (HF; 0.15-0.35 Hz, reflecting parasympathetic activity) and mid-frequency (MF; 0.05-0.15 Hz, reflecting sympathetic activity as well), derived from spectral and cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure.

Author(s): 
Bowman, A. J.
Clayton, R. H.
Murray, A.
Reed, J. W.
Subhan, M. M.
Ford, G. A.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology

A study was undertaken to observe any beneficial effect of yogic practices during training period on the young trainees. 54 trainees of 20-25 years age group were divided randomly in two groups i.e. yoga and control group. Yoga group (23 males and 5 females) was administered yogic practices for the first five months of the course while control group (21 males and 5 females) did not perform yogic exercises during this period. From the 6th to 10th month of training both the groups performed the yogic practices.

Author(s): 
Ray, U. S.
Mukhopadhyaya, S.
Purkayastha, S. S.
Asnani, V.
Tomer, O. S.
Prashad, R.
Thakur, L.
Selvamurthy, W.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology

Surya Namaskar (SN), a group of Yogic exercise consists of a set of twelve postures which is practiced by some of the yoga practitioners. The present study was undertaken to observe critically the energy cost and different cardiorespiratory changes during the practice of SN. Twenty-one male volunteers from the Indian Army practiced selected Yogic exercises for six days in a week for three months duration. The Yogic practice schedule consisted of Hatha Yogic Asanas (28 min), Pranayama (10.5 min) and Meditation (5 min).

Author(s): 
Sinha, B.
Ray, U. S.
Pathak, A.
Selvamurthy, W.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the metabolic and heart rate responses to a typical hatha yoga session. The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether a typical yoga practice using various postures meets the current recommendations for levels of physical activity required to improve and maintain health and cardiovascular fitness; 2) to determine the reliability of metabolic costs of yoga across sessions; 3) to compare the metabolic costs of yoga practice to those of treadmill walking.

Author(s): 
Hagins, Marshall
Moore, Wendy
Rundle, Andrew
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cardiac Failure

BACKGROUND: Despite recent advances in pharmacologic and device therapy, morbidity and mortality from heart failure (HF) remain high. Yoga combines physical and breathing exercises that may benefit patients with HF. We hypothesized that an 8-week regimen of yoga in addition to standard medical therapy would improve exercise capacity, inflammatory markers, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with HF. METHODS AND RESULTS: New York Heart Association Class I-III HF patients were randomized to yoga treatment (YT) or standard medical therapy (MT).

Author(s): 
Pullen, Paula R.
Nagamia, Sameer H.
Mehta, Puja K.
Thompson, Walter R.
Benardot, Dan
Hammoud, Ramadan
Parrott, Janice M.
Sola, Srikanth
Khan, Bobby V.

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