Paclitaxel

Publication Title: 
Cancer Investigation

Paclitaxel is an active agent for adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus and is a radiation sensitizer. We sought to investigate the toxicity and complete response rate of paclitaxel, cisplatin, and concurrent radiation for esophageal cancer. Forty-one patients with esophageal cancer were studied, 29 with adenocarcinomas and 12 with squamous cell cancers. Twelve patients had tumor extension into the proximal stomach and/or abdominal adenopathy.

Author(s): 
Safran, H.
Gaissert, H.
Akerman, P.
Hesketh, P. J.
Chen, M. H.
Moore, T.
Koness, J.
Graziano, S.
Wanebo, H. J.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

PURPOSE: Chemoneuropathy remains a painful, burdensome complication of cancer treatment for patients receiving a range of chemotherapeutics, yet the cause and persistence of this condition are not fully documented. This study was designed to quantify the longevity of and contributions to neuropathy following treatment with the plant alkaloids paclitaxel and vincristine.

Author(s): 
Boyette-Davis, Jessica A.
Cata, Juan P.
Driver, Larry C.
Novy, Diane M.
Bruel, Brian M.
Mooring, Deidre L.
Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen
Kennedy, William R.
Dougherty, Patrick M.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Taxol (Paclitaxel) is an important natural product for the treatment of solid tumors. Despite a well documented tubulin-stabilizing effect, many side effects of taxol therapy cannot be explained by cytoskeletal mechanisms. In the present study submicromolar concentrations of taxol, mimicking concentrations found in patients, induced cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)) oscillations in a human neuronal cell line. These oscillations were independent of extracellular and mitochondrial Ca(2+) but dependent on intact signaling via the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

Author(s): 
Boehmerle, Wolfgang
Splittgerber, Ute
Lazarus, Michael B.
McKenzie, Kathleen M.
Johnston, David G.
Austin, David J.
Ehrlich, Barbara E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Natural Products

Quantitative 1H NMR (qHNMR) provides a value-added dimension to the standard spectroscopic data set involved in structure analysis, especially when analyzing bioactive molecules and elucidating new natural products. The qHNMR method can be integrated into any routine qualitative workflow without much additional effort by simply establishing quantitative conditions for the standard solution 1H NMR experiments.

Author(s): 
Pauli, Guido F.
Jaki, Birgit U.
Lankin, David C.
Publication Title: 
Cancer immunology, immunotherapy: CII

Bone marrow myelotoxicity is a major limitation of chemotherapy. While granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment is effective, alternative approaches to support hematopoietic recovery are sought. We previously found that a beta-glucan extract from maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa (MBG) enhanced colony forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM) activity of mouse bone marrow and human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), stimulated G-CSF production and spared HPC from doxorubicin toxicity in vitro.

Author(s): 
Lin, Hong
de Stanchina, Elisa
Zhou, Xi Kathy
Hong, Feng
Seidman, Andrew
Fornier, Monica
Xiao, Wei-Lie
Kennelly, Edward J.
Wesa, Kathleen
Cassileth, Barrie R.
Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna
Publication Title: 
Brain Research

Research supports the effectiveness of acupuncture for conditions such as chronic low back and knee pain. In a five-patient pilot study the modality also improved the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Using an established rat model of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy, we evaluated the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia that has not been studied in an animal model.

Author(s): 
Meng, Xianze
Zhang, Yu
Li, Aihui
Xin, Jiajia
Lao, Lixing
Ren, Ke
Berman, Brian M.
Tan, Ming
Zhang, Rui-Xin
Publication Title: 
Annals of oncology: official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in improving quality of life (QOL), reducing chemotoxicity and modulating immune function in patients undergoing chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with ovarian cancer were randomized to receive either TCM or placebo in addition to standard chemotherapy.

Author(s): 
Chan, K. K. L.
Yao, T. J.
Jones, B.
Zhao, J. F.
Ma, F. K.
Leung, C. Y.
Lau, S. K.
Yip, M. W.
Ngan, H. Y. S.
Publication Title: 
Experimental & Molecular Medicine

Triptolide, a compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine preparation of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F., has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. However, its effect on ovarian cancer invasion is unknown. We observed that MMP7 and MMP19 expression increased in ovarian cancer tissue. Triptolide treatment inhibited the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells SKOV3 and A2780 at the concentration of 15 nM.

Author(s): 
Zhao, Hongxi
Yang, Zhifu
Wang, Xiaohong
Zhang, Xianzhi
Wang, Meng
Wang, Yukun
Mei, Qibing
Wang, Zhipeng
Publication Title: 
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

PURPOSE: Chemoneuropathy remains a painful, burdensome complication of cancer treatment for patients receiving a range of chemotherapeutics, yet the cause and persistence of this condition are not fully documented. This study was designed to quantify the longevity of and contributions to neuropathy following treatment with the plant alkaloids paclitaxel and vincristine.

Author(s): 
Boyette-Davis, Jessica A.
Cata, Juan P.
Driver, Larry C.
Novy, Diane M.
Bruel, Brian M.
Mooring, Deidre L.
Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen
Kennedy, William R.
Dougherty, Patrick M.
Publication Title: 
Neurosciences (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible protective effect of coenzyme Q10 (CQ10) on neuropathy in rats. METHODS: Experiments were conducted in the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey between January and March 2012. Forty rats were divided into 4 groups: group 1 (control), group 2 (paclitaxel), group 3 (control + CQ10), and group 4 (paclitaxel + CQ10). Group 2 and 4 rats received paclitaxel (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, on days 0, 2, 4, 6).

Author(s): 
Celebi, Nalan
Cil, Hemra
Cil, Onur
Canbay, Ozgur
Onur, Rustu
Aypar, Ulku

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