Pain, Intractable

Publication Title: 
Holistic Nursing Practice

Chronic pain is a complex phenomenon that causes a significant disruption in the lives of those affected. Chronic pain is difficult to treat and challenges healthcare professionals' abilities to implement effective treatments. Therefore, chronic pain sufferers often seek complementary alternative medicine therapies such as meditation. Literature reviews have examined studies using mindfulness-based stress reduction program as an intervention for a variety of health problems.

Author(s): 
Teixeira, M. Elizabeth
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Chronic pain is a common disabling illness that does not completely respond to current medical treatments. As a consequence, in recent years many alternative interventions have been suggested. Among them, mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are receiving growing attention. The aim of the present article is to review controlled studies investigating the efficacy of MBIs for the reduction of pain and the improvement of depressive symptoms in patients suffering from chronic pain.

Author(s): 
Chiesa, Alberto
Serretti, Alessandro
Publication Title: 
Cancer prevention & control: CPC = Prevention & controle en cancerologie: PCC

PURPOSE: Health care professionals at 2 Ontario cancer centres were surveyed to determine their familiarity with, perceptions of and interest in learning more about nonpharmacologic strategies for the management of cancer pain. Evidence-based education sessions were subsequently developed for the 5 strategies in which participants were most interested. This article presents the results of critical literature reviews concerning the effectiveness of the 5 strategies: acupuncture, massage therapy, hypnosis, therapeutic touch and biofeedback.

Author(s): 
Sellick, S. M.
Zaza, C.
Publication Title: 
Cancer prevention & control: CPC = Prevention & controle en cancerologie: PCC

PURPOSE: Health care professionals at 2 Ontario cancer centres were surveyed to determine their familiarity with, perceptions of and interest in learning more about nonpharmacologic strategies for the management of cancer pain. Evidence-based education sessions were subsequently developed for the 5 strategies in which participants were most interested. This article presents the results of critical literature reviews concerning the effectiveness of the 5 strategies: acupuncture, massage therapy, hypnosis, therapeutic touch and biofeedback.

Author(s): 
Sellick, S. M.
Zaza, C.
Publication Title: 
Cancer prevention & control: CPC = Prevention & controle en cancerologie: PCC

PURPOSE: Health care professionals at 2 Ontario cancer centres were surveyed to determine their familiarity with, perceptions of and interest in learning more about nonpharmacologic strategies for the management of cancer pain. Evidence-based education sessions were subsequently developed for the 5 strategies in which participants were most interested. This article presents the results of critical literature reviews concerning the effectiveness of the 5 strategies: acupuncture, massage therapy, hypnosis, therapeutic touch and biofeedback.

Author(s): 
Sellick, S. M.
Zaza, C.
Publication Title: 
Minerva Medica
Author(s): 
Brugnoli, A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Human Stress

For the past twenty years hypnotherapy and self-hypnosis have been utilized as valid tools for the successful management of severe protracted pain. Control often has been achieved in cases where other modalities of pain management had been inadequate. Hypnosis properly applied can bring some degree of improvement to 90 percent of patients. More remarkable degree of pain relief is achievable in the 25 percent of patients who have high hypnotic "talent," and with very limited expenditure of time and effort.

Author(s): 
Sacerdote, P.
Publication Title: 
Geriatrics

It is helpful to perceive pain and suffering as separate entities when planning therapy. The physical, anatomic, and electrochemical expression of pain is treated by physical therapy, medicines, nerve block, electric stimulators, and surgery. The suffering component involves the patient's (1) nonacceptance, (2) fear of the unknown, (3) pessimistic evaluation of the meaning of pain, (4) feeling of no time limit to suffering, and (5) often self-destructive feelings of guilt and resentment. These emotions and imaginings are quite amenable to good hypnotherapy.

Author(s): 
Ewin, D. M.
Publication Title: 
Anaesthesia

The psychotropic drugs in the treatment of chronic pain have value in several areas. They not only influence the mood of the patient but also provide hypnosis, augment the activity of the analgesics and exhibit analgesic potency in their own right. They may be used alone, or in combination with analgesic agents or with each other. The three most valuable groups are the antidepressants, tranquillizers and anticonvulsants, all of which exert their effect by influencing the intracerebral levels of various neurotransmitter amines.

Author(s): 
Budd, K.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Nursing
Author(s): 
Barber, J.

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