Pain Management

Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: This manuscript reviews peer-reviewed literature published from 2010-2012 relevant to the management of chronic pain in the primary care setting. DESIGN: Narrative review of peer-reviewed literature. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and reference lists and queried expert contacts for English-language studies related to the management of chronic noncancer pain in adult patients in primary care settings.

Author(s): 
Frank, Joseph W.
Bair, Matthew J.
Becker, William C.
Krebs, Erin E.
Liebschutz, Jane M.
Alford, Daniel P.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Although emerging evidence during the past several decades suggests that psychosocial factors can directly influence both physiologic function and health outcomes, medicine had failed to move beyond the biomedical model, in part because of lack of exposure to the evidence base supporting the biopsychosocial model. The literature was reviewed to examine the efficacy of representative psychosocial-mind-body interventions, including relaxation, (cognitive) behavioral therapies, meditation, imagery, biofeedback, and hypnosis for several common clinical conditions.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Shapiro, Shauna L.
Eisenberg, David M.
Forys, Kelly L.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

BACKGROUND: A total of 2.7 million patients present to US emergency departments annually for management of low back pain (LBP). Despite optimal medical therapy, more than 50% remain functionally impaired 3 months later. We performed a systematic review to address the following question: Among patients with nonchronic LBP, does spinal manipulation, massage, exercise, or yoga, when combined with standard medical therapy, improve pain and functional outcomes more than standard medical therapy alone?

Author(s): 
Rothberg, Samantha
Friedman, Benjamin W.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Mind-body therapies are popular and are ranked among the top 10 complementary and integrative medicine practices reportedly used by adults and children in the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of mind-body therapies in pediatrics. This clinical report outlines popular mind-body therapies for children and youth and examines the best-available evidence for a variety of mind-body therapies and practices, including biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga.

Author(s): 
SECTION ON INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
Publication Title: 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches as part of their pain management strategy.

Author(s): 
Nahin, Richard L.
Boineau, Robin
Khalsa, Partap S.
Stussman, Barbara J.
Weber, Wendy J.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence supporting the use of relaxation therapies for pain management in labour. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of relaxation methods for pain management in labour on maternal and perinatal morbidity.

Author(s): 
Smith, Caroline A.
Levett, Kate M.
Collins, Carmel T.
Crowther, Caroline A.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and evidence for pain reduction in older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain in the following mind-body therapies: biofeedback, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, hypnosis, tai chi, qi gong, and yoga. METHODS: Relevant studies in the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were located. A manual search of references from retrieved articles was also conducted.

Author(s): 
Morone, Natalia E.
Greco, Carol M.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for any type of pain. METHOD: Seven databases were searched from their inception to February 2011. Randomized clinical trials were considered if they investigated yoga in patients with any type of pain and if they assessed pain as a primary outcome measure. The 5-point Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality of studies. The selection of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were performed independently by two reviewers.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Ernst, Edzard
Terry, Rohini
Lee, Myeong Soo
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha
Deng, Gary
Hershman, Dawn
Mumber, Matthew
Perlmutter, Jane
Seely, Dugald
Sen, Ananda
Zick, Suzanna M.
Tripathy, Debu
Society for Integrative Oncology
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Although emerging evidence during the past several decades suggests that psychosocial factors can directly influence both physiologic function and health outcomes, medicine had failed to move beyond the biomedical model, in part because of lack of exposure to the evidence base supporting the biopsychosocial model. The literature was reviewed to examine the efficacy of representative psychosocial-mind-body interventions, including relaxation, (cognitive) behavioral therapies, meditation, imagery, biofeedback, and hypnosis for several common clinical conditions.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Shapiro, Shauna L.
Eisenberg, David M.
Forys, Kelly L.

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