Pain, Postoperative

Publication Title: 
The Clinical Journal of Pain

This paper reviews the evidence for mind-body therapies (eg, relaxation, meditation, imagery, cognitive-behavioral therapy) in the treatment of pain-related medical conditions and suggests directions for future research in these areas.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Publication Title: 
The Clinical Journal of Pain

This paper reviews the evidence for mind-body therapies (eg, relaxation, meditation, imagery, cognitive-behavioral therapy) in the treatment of pain-related medical conditions and suggests directions for future research in these areas.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Surgery

BACKGROUND: Pain present for at least 3 months after a surgical procedure is considered chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) and affects 10-50 per cent of patients. Interventions for CPSP may focus on the underlying condition that indicated surgery, the aetiology of new-onset pain or be multifactorial in recognition of the diverse causes of this pain. The aim of this systematic review was to identify RCTs of interventions for the management of CPSP, and synthesize data across treatment type to estimate their effectiveness and safety.

Author(s): 
Wylde, V.
Dennis, J.
Beswick, A. D.
Bruce, J.
Eccleston, C.
Howells, N.
Peters, T. J.
Gooberman-Hill, R.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesia and Analgesia

BACKGROUND: Suggestive interventions such as hypnosis and therapeutic suggestions are frequently used to alleviate surgical side effects; however, the effectiveness of therapeutic suggestion intervention has not yet been systematically evaluated.

Author(s): 
Kekecs, Zoltán
Nagy, Tamás
Varga, Katalin
Publication Title: 
The Clinical Journal of Pain

This paper reviews the evidence for mind-body therapies (eg, relaxation, meditation, imagery, cognitive-behavioral therapy) in the treatment of pain-related medical conditions and suggests directions for future research in these areas.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Since this review, more detailed bibliographic searching has become possible, additional studies testing psychological preparation for surgery have been completed and hospital procedures have changed.

Author(s): 
Powell, Rachael
Scott, Neil W.
Manyande, Anne
Bruce, Julie
Vögele, Claus
Byrne-Davis, Lucie M. T.
Unsworth, Mary
Osmer, Christian
Johnston, Marie
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with acupuncture. Potentially relevant reviews were searched through the register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and bibliographies of articles and books.

Author(s): 
Linde, K.
Vickers, A.
Hondras, M.
ter Riet, G.
Thormählen, J.
Berman, B.
Melchart, D.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine which analgesic modalities used following discharge have the greatest efficacy in reducing postoperative pain after elective non-axial orthopedic surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: A systematic review was conducted using the databases CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, as well as clinical practice guidelines databases and trial registries. Titles and abstracts were perused by two reviewers for randomized clinical trials in English fulfilling inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Roberts, Matthew
Brodribb, Wendy
Mitchell, Geoffrey
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit.

Author(s): 
Barlow, Timothy
Downham, Christopher
Barlow, David
Publication Title: 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence of any type of therapeutic or preventive intervention testing homeopathy for childhood and adolescence ailments. METHODS: Systematic literature searches were conducted through January 2006 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Central, British Homeopathic Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the UK National Research Register. Bibliographies were checked for further relevant publications. Studies were selected according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Altunç, Umut
Pittler, Max H.
Ernst, Edzard

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