Palliative Care

Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Managing cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is an important element of the palliative care of cancer patients. The aim of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture (AT) or electroacupuncture (EA) for CRF. METHODS: Fourteen databases were searched from their respective inception to November 2012. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of AT or EA for the treatment of CRF were considered for inclusion. The risk of bias/methodological quality was assessed using the method suggested by the Cochrane Collaboration.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Moon, Tae-Woong
Choi, Tae-Young
Park, Tae-Yong
Lee, Myeong Soo
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: This study aims to systematically appraise the evidence for the use of acupuncture for symptom management in cancer and supportive care and to identify recommendations for clinical practice and future research. METHODS: A systematic search was carried out to identify reviews of the use of acupuncture in cancer supportive and palliative care, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, British Nursing Index, Index to Theses, Dissertations and Theses (via Proquest) and NHS evidence. Search terms included: acupuncture, cancer and symptoms.

Author(s): 
Towler, P.
Molassiotis, A.
Brearley, S. G.
Publication Title: 
Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To critically evaluate the currently available randomized clinical trials regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in palliative care for cancer patients, hence, to provide sufficient evidences for the widespread use of acupuncture in cancer treatment. METHODS: Two independent reviewers extracted data from all of the randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy of acupuncture in palliative care for cancer patients. Seven databases were searched from their respective inception to December 2010.

Author(s): 
Lian, Wei-Ling
Pan, Min-qi
Zhou, Dai-han
Zhang, Zhang-Jin
Publication Title: 
Medicine

Available systematic reviews showed uncertainty on the effectiveness of using acupuncture and related therapies for palliative cancer care. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize current best evidence on acupuncture and related therapies for palliative cancer care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture and related therapies with conventional or sham treatments were considered.

Author(s): 
Lau, Charlotte H. Y.
Wu, Xinyin
Chung, Vincent C. H.
Liu, Xin
Hui, Edwin P.
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Wong, Samuel Y. S.
Lau, Alexander Y. L.
Sit, Regina S. T.
Ziea, Eric T. C.
Ng, Bacon F. L.
Wu, Justin C. Y.
Publication Title: 
Scientific Reports

Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory.

Author(s): 
Wu, Xinyin
Chung, Vincent C. H.
Hui, Edwin P.
Ziea, Eric T. C.
Ng, Bacon F. L.
Ho, Robin S. T.
Tsoi, Kelvin K. F.
Wong, Samuel Y. S.
Wu, Justin C. Y.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Palliative Nursing

Palliative medicine and complementary therapies (CTs) have developed within the NHS as parallel philosophies of care. As a result, the last decade has seen an increase in the integration and usage of CTs, as adjunct therapies to conventional medical treatment. Documented benefits of relaxation, decreased perception of pain, reduced anxiety and improved sense of wellbeing have been shown to enable an enhanced quality of life, where curative treatment is no longer an option. Reiki is a more recent addition to the range of CTs available to cancer patients.

Author(s): 
Burden, Barbara
Herron-Marx, Sandy
Clifford, Collette
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cancer Education: The Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education

BACKGROUND: Following a survey of health professionals' familiarity with 19 non-pharmacologic interventions for cancer pain, evidence-based continuing education sessions were conducted on the five therapies about which the professionals reported being most interested in learning more. METHODS: Three months following the education sessions, the original questionnaire was re-administered. Responses from the original survey were compared with those on the post-education survey.

Author(s): 
Zaza, C.
Sellick, S.
Publication Title: 
Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)

MATERIALS AND METHODS: To evaluate the evidence for clinically established pharmacological therapies for constipation in palliative care, a systematic literature review was performed in different databases (Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL), textbooks, and publications.

Author(s): 
Bader, S.
Weber, M.
Becker, G.
Publication Title: 
Nihon Shinkei Seishin Yakurigaku Zasshi = Japanese Journal of Psychopharmacology

Recent human brain imaging studies have examined differences in activity in the nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.) in response to heat stimuli between controls and patients with chronic pain, and have revealed that the N.Acc. plays a role in predicting the value of a noxious stimulus and its offset, and in the consequent changes in the motivational state. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of change in the circuitry involved in emotion and motivation in response to chronic pain stimuli were not fully explored.

Author(s): 
Ikegami, Daigo
Yamashita, Akira
Narita, Minoru
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Care

The principle of double effect is widely used to permit the administration of narcotics and sedatives with the intent to palliate dying patients, even though the administration of these drugs may cause hastening of death. In recent medical literature, this principle's validity has been severely criticized, causing health care providers to fear providing good palliative care. Most of the criticisms levelled at the principle of double effect arise from misconceptions about its purpose and origins.

Author(s): 
Hawryluck, L. A.
Harvey, W. R.

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