Palliative Care

Publication Title: 
Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics

The use of terminal sedation to control the intense discomfort of dying patients appears both to be an established practice in palliative care and to run counter to the moral and legal norm that forbids health care professionals from intentionally killing patients. This raises the worry that the requirements of established palliative care are incompatible with moral and legal opposition to euthanasia. This paper explains how the doctrine of double effect can be relied on to distinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia.

Author(s): 
Boyle, Joseph
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In 2000, people aged 65 and older made up 12.4 percent of the U.S. population. Between now and 2011, when the earliest-born of the baby-boom generation reaches that age, the nation will see a rapid growth in its senior citizen population. It has been estimated that pain occurs in from 45 percent to 85 percent of the geriatric population. Much of it is undertreated. Undertreated pain leads to other problems, including reduced quality of life, decreased socialization, depression, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition.

Author(s): 
Robinson, Carolyn Louise
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Medicine

Recent statements emanating from high-level church authorities have reignited discussion over the traditional Roman Catholic doctrine guiding end-of-life care. Although these statements concerned the specific issue of artificial nutrition and hydration for patients in a persistent vegetative state, they contain principles that might be applied to other life-prolonging interventions. This paper examines the origins of the Catholic moral tradition that guides end-of-life care.

Author(s): 
Bradley, Ciar·n T.
Publication Title: 
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement

Looking back over the span of years surveyed, it appears that a sad experience, even many years ago, commonly leaves residual pain. This can be modified by sympathetic support enabling parents and baby to interact, although such interaction is not without painful as well as pleasurable effects. Coming to terms with loss may take longer than was previously thought. This study highlights the need for bereavement care, which aims to leave families with positive rather than negative feelings.

Author(s): 
Delight, E.
Goodall, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Care

This paper explores how music therapy can assist patients and relatives in the processes of making friendship and love audible in a child cancer ward. Four short patient histories are presented to illustrate a health-oriented, ecological music therapy practice. Two histories describe how texts, made by patients, become songs, and how the songs are performed and used. Another two histories deal with musical communication with dying children and their parents.

Author(s): 
Aasgaard, T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Care

The aim of this study was to illuminate the way of being a family when one family member is in the midst of living and dying. A family systems frame and a life world perspective were used in interviews with five families. A qualitative analysis inspired by Giorgi revealed dialectic and dynamic processes in constant motion within and between the continua being in affinity-being in loneliness, being in power-being in helplessness, and being in continuity-being in disruption.

Author(s): 
SyrÈn, Susanne M.
Saveman, Britt-Inger
Benzein, Eva G.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care

Lullabies and laments promote new awareness, enculturation, adaptation, and grief expression. These concepts' relevance to palliative care, however, has not been examined. In this study, a music therapist used a grounded theory-informed design to reflexively analyze lullaby and lament qualities, evident in more than 20 years of personal palliative care practice. Thus, the construct "lullament" emerged, which signified helpful moments when patients' and families' personal and sociohistorical relationship with lullabies and laments were actualized.

Author(s): 
O'Callaghan, Clare
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Nursing

Fifty-four thousand children die each year despite the advances in care for children with acute and chronic illnesses. Demands for improved palliative and end-of-life care for children exist. Good death is a concept frequently used in the adult hospice movement. However, how can the death of a child be good? Analysis of good death can assist pediatric nurses to understand the concept and provide a framework for nurses in the clinical and research arenas to work together to develop and provide evidence-based, developmentally appropriate care for dying children and their families.

Author(s): 
Welch, Susan Bush
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Psychology

We present a body of evidence for love medicine, originating in the shamanic physical/spiritual healing arts, embodying end-of-life (EOL) palliation through relationships of loving, artful witness between caregivers and receivers.

Author(s): 
Lander, Dorothy A.
Graham-Pole, John R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Palliative Care

The purpose of this study was to develop a scale assessing the spiritual needs of Korean patients with cancer. For the scale development, qualitative interviews and theoretical analyses were conducted to extract measurable constructs within the Korean culture. As a result, 26 items were developed for the validation of a scale. The scale was administered to 257 cancer patients; the reliability and validity of the scale were examined using Cronbach's alpha and factor analysis, respectively. The reliability was 0.92.

Author(s): 
Yong, Jinsun
Kim, Juhu
Han, Sung-Suk
Puchalski, Christina M.

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