Panic Disorder

Publication Title: 
Journal of Physical Activity & Health

BACKGROUND: This study describes evidence of yoga's effectiveness for depressive disorders, general anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults. We also address adverse events associated with yoga. METHODS: We searched multiple electronic databases for systematic reviews (SRs) published between 2008 and July 2014, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) not identified in eligible SRs, and ongoing RCTs registered with ClincalTrials.gov. RESULTS: We identified 1 SR on depression, 1 for adverse events, and 3 addressing multiple conditions.

Author(s): 
Duan-Porter, Wei
Coeytaux, Remy R.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Goode, Adam P.
Sharma, Poonam
Mennella, Hillary
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry

BACKGROUND: This meta-analysis investigates the efficacy of exercise as a treatment for DSM-IV diagnosed anxiety disorders. METHODS: We searched PubMED and PsycINFO for randomized, controlled trials comparing the anxiolytic effects of aerobic exercise to other treatment conditions for DSM-IV defined anxiety disorders. Seven trials were included in the final analysis, totaling 407 subjects. The control conditions included non-aerobic exercise, waitlist/placebo, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychoeducation and meditation.

Author(s): 
Bartley, Christine A.
Hay, Madeleine
Bloch, Michael H.
Publication Title: 
International Clinical Psychopharmacology

To our knowledge, no previous meta-analysis has attempted to compare the efficacy of pharmacological, psychological and combined treatments for the three main anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia). Pre-post and treated versus control effect sizes (ES) were calculated for all evaluable randomized-controlled studies (n = 234), involving 37,333 patients.

Author(s): 
Bandelow, Borwin
Reitt, Markus
Röver, Christian
Michaelis, Sophie
Görlich, Yvonne
Wedekind, Dirk
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of hypnosis in adult irritable bowel syndrome by a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. METHODS: Studies were identified by a literature search of the databases Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus (from inception to June 30, 2013). Primary outcomes were adequate symptom relief, global gastrointestinal score, and safety.

Author(s): 
Schaefert, Rainer
Klose, Petra
Moser, Gabriele
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Presse Medicale (Paris, France: 1983)

OBJECTIVE: Hypnosis is classically presented as a useful psychotherapy for various psychiatric conditions, especially in the field of stress and anxiety. However, its place in therapeutic of chronic anxiety disorders remains unclear and questioned. Thus, the goal of this systematic review was to analyse the papers reporting clinical data on the efficacy of hypnosis in anxiety disorders.

Author(s): 
Pelissolo, Antoine
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: Galanin (GAL) is a neuropeptide, which is expressed primarily in limbic nuclei in the brain and mediates miscellaneous physiological processes and behaviors. In animal studies, both the application of GAL and antagonism of its receptors have been shown to affect anxiety-like and depression-related behavior. In humans, intravenous administration of the neuropeptide galanin has been reported to have fast antidepressant efficacy.

Author(s): 
Unschuld, Paul G.
Ising, Marcus
Erhardt, Angelika
Lucae, Susanne
Kohli, Martin
Kloiber, Stefan
Salyakina, Daria
Thoeringer, Christoph K.
Kern, Nikola
Lieb, Roselind
Uhr, Manfred
Binder, Elisabeth B.
M¸ller-Myhsok, Bertram
Holsboer, Florian
Keck, Martin E.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics: The Official Publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics

Panic disorder (PD) is a common mental disorder, ranking highest among the anxiety disorders in terms of disease burden. The pathogenesis of PD is multifactorial with significant heritability, however only a few convincing risk genes have been reported thus far. One of the most promising candidates is the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), due to its key role in monoaminergic neurotransmission, established validity of animal models, and the efficacy of MAO inhibitors in the treatment of PD.

Author(s): 
Reif, Andreas
Weber, Heike
Domschke, Katharina
Klauke, Benedikt
Baumann, Christian
Jacob, Christian P.
Strˆhle, Andreas
Gerlach, Alexander L.
Alpers, Georg W.
Pauli, Paul
Hamm, Alfons
Kircher, Tilo
Arolt, Volker
Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich
Binder, Elisabeth B.
Erhardt, Angelika
Deckert, J¸rgen
Publication Title: 
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry

Glutamate decarboxylases (GAD67/65; GAD1/GAD2) are crucially involved in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and thus were repeatedly suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. In the present study, DNA methylation patterns in the GAD1 and GAD2 promoter and GAD1 intron 2 regions were investigated for association with panic disorder, with particular attention to possible effects of environmental factors.

Author(s): 
Domschke, Katharina
Tidow, Nicola
Schrempf, Marie
Schwarte, Kathrin
Klauke, Benedikt
Reif, Andreas
Kersting, Anette
Arolt, Volker
Zwanzger, Peter
Deckert, J¸rgen
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Psychiatry

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review aims to deliver a systematic overview of current developments and trends in (epi)genetics of anxiety and to identify upcoming challenges and opportunities. RECENT FINDINGS: Genes related to peptide and hormone signaling have been suggested for anxiety-related phenotypes, e.g., the NPSR1 gene, which has been associated predominantly with panic disorder in women, and shown to interact with environmental factors and to influence psychometric, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging correlates of anxiety.

Author(s): 
Gottschalk, Michael G.
Domschke, Katharina
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

We have known of the interaction between music and mood for many years. In this paper, I present a series of case vignettes to illustrate a method using music to affect mood. In hypnosis, I suggested that subjects imagine hearing a piece of music appropriate to a desired emotion, rather like a sound track for a movie. I suggested that the patients vividly recall this music and the accompanying feelings outside of trance when it would be desirable to help them to change their behavior by influencing their emotional state. In this way, music can be used to shape emotion.

Author(s): 
Kelly, S. F.

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