PC12 Cells

Publication Title: 
Molecules (Basel, Switzerland)

Terminalia chebula, native to Southeast Asia, is a popular medicinal plant in Ayurveda. It has been previously reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory efficacy. In this study, we aimed to investigate if fruit extract from T. chebula might protect neuronal cells against ischemia and related diseases by reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD-R) ischemia and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

Author(s): 
Gaire, Bhakta Prasad
Jamarkattel-Pandit, Nirmala
Lee, Donghun
Song, Jungbin
Kim, Ji Young
Park, Juyeon
Jung, Soyoung
Choi, Ho-Young
Kim, Hocheol
Publication Title: 
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders

BACKGROUND: Quinolinic acid (QA) is a product of tryptophan degradation and its pathologic accumulation has been found to induce neuroinflammatory and demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis via excessive free radicals generation. Recent studies showed that Terminalia chebula has several pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. The aim of this study was evaluation of the protective effect of T. chebula alcoholic extract (TCAE) on oxidative PC12 and OLN-93 cells death induced by QA.

Author(s): 
Sadeghnia, Hamid R.
Jamshidi, Roya
Afshari, Amir R.
Mollazadeh, Hamid
Forouzanfar, Fatemeh
Rakhshandeh, Hasan
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

In lower organisms, increased expression of the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sir2 augments lifespan. The mechanism through which this life extension is mediated remains incompletely understood. Here we have examined the cellular effects of overexpression of SIRT1, the closest mammalian ortholog of Sir2. In PC12 cells, increased expression of the NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 reduces cellular oxygen consumption by approximately 25%. We further demonstrate that SIRT1 expression can alter the transcriptional activity of the mitochondrial biogenesis coactivator PGC-1alpha.

Author(s): 
Nemoto, Shino
Fergusson, Maria M.
Finkel, Toren
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurochemistry

The human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene has a 42†bp evolutionarily conserved region designated (CR) II at -7.24†kb, which bears 93% homology to the region we earlier identified as containing the glucocorticoid response element, a 7†bp activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like motif in the rat TH gene. We cloned this hTH-CRII region upstream of minimal basal hTH promoter in luciferase (Luc) reporter vector, and tested glucocorticoid responsiveness in human cell lines.

Author(s): 
Sheela Rani, C. S.
Soto-Pina, Alexandra
Iacovitti, Lorraine
Strong, Randy
Publication Title: 
Trends in Biochemical Sciences

Reversible acetylation has emerged as a key post-translational modification of proteins. Although the number of acetylated proteins is rapidly growing, the ways in which protein acetyltransferases and deacetylases connect with extracellular stimuli remain unclear. Recently, a regulatory network has emerged that controls the expression and activity of SIRT1, a mammalian class-III protein deacetylase. SIRT1 is an important regulator of metabolism, senescence, cancer and, possibly, longevity and is connected with crucial stress-responsive signal-transduction pathways.

Author(s): 
Kwon, Hye-Sook
Ott, Melanie
Publication Title: 
BMC genomics

BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is intimately tied to amyloid-? (A?) peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of A? aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal A? subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the A? precursor protein (APP) account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene (APP) may play a more important role in AD etiology.

Author(s): 
Lahiri, Debomoy K.
Maloney, Bryan
Rogers, Jack T.
Ge, Yuan-Wen
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease that predisposes individuals to develop benign neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Due to the lack of information on the molecular mechanism of NF1-associated tumor pathogenesis or biomarkers/therapeutic targets, an effective treatment for NF1 tumors has not been established.

Author(s): 
Kobayashi, Daiki
Hirayama, Mio
Komohara, Yoshihiro
Mizuguchi, Souhei
Wilson Morifuji, Masayo
Ihn, Hironobu
Takeya, Motohiro
Kuramochi, Akira
Araki, Norie
Publication Title: 
Acta Medica Okayama

We studied the effects of natural essential oil on neurite outgrowth in PC12m3 neuronal cells to elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of the oils used in aromatherapy. Neurite outgrowth can be induced by nerve growth factor (NGF), where ERK and p38 MAPK among MAPK pathways play important roles in activating intracellular signal transduction. In this study, we investigated whether d-limonene, the major component of essential oils from oranges, can promote neurite outgrowth in PC12m3 cells, in which neurite outgrowth can be induced by various physical stimulations.

Author(s): 
Shinomiya, Misae
Kawamura, Kenji
Tanida, Emiko
Nagoshi, Megumi
Motoda, Hirotoshi
Kasanami, Yoshiko
Hiragami, Fukumi
Kano, Yoshio
Publication Title: 
Molecules (Basel, Switzerland)

Terminalia chebula, native to Southeast Asia, is a popular medicinal plant in Ayurveda. It has been previously reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory efficacy. In this study, we aimed to investigate if fruit extract from T. chebula might protect neuronal cells against ischemia and related diseases by reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD-R) ischemia and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

Author(s): 
Gaire, Bhakta Prasad
Jamarkattel-Pandit, Nirmala
Lee, Donghun
Song, Jungbin
Kim, Ji Young
Park, Juyeon
Jung, Soyoung
Choi, Ho-Young
Kim, Hocheol
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

A number of Indian medicinal plants have been used for thousands of years in the traditional system of medicine (Ayurveda). Amongst these are plants used for the management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, loss of memory, degeneration of nerves and other neuronal disorders by the Ayurvedic practitioners. Though the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases remains enigmatic, there is evidence, which indicates that defective energy metabolism, excitotoxicity and oxidative damage may be crucial factors (Ann. Neurol. 38 (3) (1995) 357).

Author(s): 
Auddy, B.
Ferreira, M.
Blasina, F.
Lafon, L.
Arredondo, F.
Dajas, F.
Tripathi, P. C.
Seal, T.
Mukherjee, B.

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