Peak Expiratory Flow Rate

Publication Title: 
Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

BACKGROUND: Although physical exercise is recommended for asthmatics, evidence on the effects of exercise on clinical key factors is still missing. OBJECTIVES: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of exercise training (EXT) on quality of life (QoL), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), lung function and exercise capacity, plus the factors affecting changes in QoL and exercise capacity in asthmatics after a period of EXT.

Author(s): 
Eichenberger, Philipp A.
Diener, Stephanie N.
Kofmehl, Reto
Spengler, Christina M.
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that homoeopathy is a placebo by examining its effect in patients with allergic rhinitis and so contest the evidence from three previous trials in this series. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, multicentre study. SETTING: Four general practices and a hospital ear, nose, and throat outpatient department. PARTICIPANTS: 51 patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. INTERVENTION: Random assignment to an oral 30c homoeopathic preparation of principal inhalant allergen or to placebo.

Author(s): 
Taylor, M. A.
Reilly, D.
Llewellyn-Jones, R. H.
McSharry, C.
Aitchison, T. C.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Allergy

The efficacy of hypnotherapy in aborting acute asthmatic attacks was studied in 17 children ranging in age from six to 17. All had as their primary diagnosis bronchial asthma. Prior to hypnotic induction pulmonary function was assessed, then monitored in the immediate post hypnotic period and at two intervals thereafter. The average improvement for all subjects was greater than 50% above the baseline measurement as documented by spirometry, monitored dyspnea, wheezing and subjective ratings by the subjects.

Author(s): 
Aronoff, G. M.
Aronoff, S.
Peck, L. W.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

Hyperventilation in asthmatic subjects causes airways obstruction as demonstrated by a fall in the Forced Expiratory Volume in one second. Clinically, measurements of blood gases during asthmatic attacks have shown that asthmatic subjects, who hyperventilate have a blood carbon dioxide level below normal unless ventilatory failure occurs. Two methods of demonstrating that asthmatic subjects hyperventilate on the thought of asthma were employed. 1. Chronic asthmatic subjects had their respiratory minute volume measured during relaxation and at the recall of an asthmatic attack.

Author(s): 
Clarke, P. S.
Gibson, J. R.
Publication Title: 
Lancet (London, England)

The effects of two pranayama yoga breathing exercises on airway reactivity, airway calibre, symptom scores, and medication use in patients with mild asthma were assessed in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. After baseline assessment over 1 week, 18 patients with mild asthma practised slow deep breathing for 15 min twice a day for two consecutive 2-week periods.

Author(s): 
Singh, V.
Wisniewski, A.
Britton, J.
Tattersfield, A.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology

Breathing is the most vital function for maintenance of life. Slow and deep breathing is an integral part of Pranayama and it reduces dead space ventilation and renews air throughout the lungs. The reported beneficial effects of deep breathing as a part of either long term or short term practice of Pranayama are well documented. However our knowledge about the effects of a few minutes' of deep breathing on human ventilatory parameters is poor.

Author(s): 
Sivakumar, G.
Prabhu, Krishnamoorthi
Baliga, Rekha
Pai, M. Kirtana
Manjunatha, S.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Medical Research

The gum resin of Boswellia serrata, known in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine as Salai guggal, contains boswellic acids, which have been shown to inhibit leukotriene biosynthesis. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study forty patients, 23 males and 17 females in the age range of 18 - 75 years having mean duration of illness, bronchial asthma, of 9.58 +/- 6.07 years were treated with a preparation of gum resin of 300 mg thrice daily for a period of 6 weeks.

Author(s): 
Gupta, I.
Gupta, V.
Parihar, A.
Gupta, S.
Ludtke, R.
Safayhi, H.
Ammon, H. P.
Publication Title: 
Singapore Medical Journal

A study of the effect of yoga therapy programme on 46 indoor patients of chronic bronchial asthma on exercise capacity, pulmonary functions and blood gases was conducted. Exercise capacity was measured by 3 tests: (i) 12 min walk test (12-md); (ii) physical fitness index (PFI) by modified Harvard step test; and (iii) Exercise-Liability index (ELI). Yoga therapy programme resulted in a significant increase in the pulmonary functions and exercise tolerance. A one-year follow-up study showed a good to fair response with reduced symptoms score and drug requirements in these subjects.

Author(s): 
Jain, S. C.
Talukdar, B.
Publication Title: 
BMC pulmonary medicine

BACKGROUND: There is a substantial body of evidence on the efficacy of yoga in the management of bronchial asthma. Many studies have reported, as the effects of yoga on bronchial asthma, significant improvements in pulmonary functions, quality of life and reduction in airway hyper-reactivity, frequency of attacks and medication use. In addition, a few studies have attempted to understand the effects of yoga on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) or exercise tolerance capacity.

Author(s): 
Vempati, Ramaprabhu
Bijlani, Ramesh Lal
Deepak, Kishore Kumar
Publication Title: 
Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

BACKGROUND: Although physical exercise is recommended for asthmatics, evidence on the effects of exercise on clinical key factors is still missing. OBJECTIVES: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of exercise training (EXT) on quality of life (QoL), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), lung function and exercise capacity, plus the factors affecting changes in QoL and exercise capacity in asthmatics after a period of EXT.

Author(s): 
Eichenberger, Philipp A.
Diener, Stephanie N.
Kofmehl, Reto
Spengler, Christina M.

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