Phototherapy

Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, the Cochrane Library and previous review papers. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of each treatment, the rationale behind the treatment, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Rodgers, Bryan
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) partnered to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of depressive disorders. A revision of these guidelines was undertaken by CANMAT in 2008-2009 to reflect advances in the field. There is widespread interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
Lam, Raymond W.
Filteau, Marie J.
Lespérance, François
Kennedy, Sidney H.
Parikh, Sagar V.
Patten, Scott B.
Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT)
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: Depressed and anxious patients often combine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies with conventional pharmacotherapy to self-treat symptoms. The benefits and risks of such combination strategies have not been fully evaluated. This paper evaluates the risk-benefit profile of CAM augmentation to antidepressants in affective conditions. METHODS: PubMed was searched for all available clinical reports published in English up to December 2012. Data were evaluated based on graded levels of evidence for efficacy and safety.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
da Silva, Tricia L.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, the Cochrane Library and previous review papers. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of each treatment, the rationale behind the treatment, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Rodgers, Bryan
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

BACKGROUND: This article is a critical review of the efficacy of selected alternative treatments for unipolar depression including exercise, stress management techniques, acupuncture, St. John's wort, bright light, and sleep deprivation. Issues related to women across the life span, including pregnancy and lactation, are highlighted. DATA SOURCES: Evidence of efficacy is based on randomized controlled trials. A distinction is made between studies that address depressive symptoms and studies that address depressive disorders.

Author(s): 
Manber, Rachel
Allen, John J. B.
Morris, Margaret E.
Morris, Margaret M.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis affects 1-3% of the population, in some people causing changes to the nails and joints in addition to skin lesions. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of systemic drug treatments, topical drug treatments, and non-drug treatments (other than ultraviolet light) for chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of ultraviolet light treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis?

Author(s): 
Naldi, Luigi
Rzany, Berthold
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis affects 1-3% of the population, in some people causing changes to the nails and joints in addition to skin lesions. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of systemic drug treatments, topical drug treatments, and non-drug treatments (other than ultraviolet light) for chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of ultraviolet light treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis?

Author(s): 
Naldi, Luigi
Rzany, Berthold
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: A meta-analysis of 21 studies suggests the mean prevalence rate for depression across the antenatal period is 10.7%, ranging from 7.4% in the first trimester to a high of 12.8% in the second trimester. Due to maternal treatment preferences and potential concerns about fetal and infant health outcomes, diverse non-pharmacological treatment options are needed. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of interventions other than pharmacological, psychosocial, or psychological interventions compared with usual antepartum care in the treatment of antenatal depression.

Author(s): 
Dennis, Cindy-Lee
Dowswell, Therese
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: For women suffering from an antepartum mental disorder (AMD), there is lack of evidence-based treatment algorithms due to the complicated risk-benefit analysis for both mother and unborn child. We aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to treat AMD and performed a meta-analysis of the estimated treatment effect on the psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
van Ravesteyn, Leontien M.
Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P.
Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.
Kamperman, Astrid M.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Interventions in Aging

OBJECTIVE: The current review aims to evaluate the sensory stimulation interventions in terms of reducing sleeping disturbances in patients with dementia. The nonpharmacological interventions seem to be an efficient, inexpensive, and easy tool for family caregivers. Moreover, sleeping disorders increase caregivers' distress and may lead to hospitalization. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed. Eleven randomized controlled trials have been found.

Author(s): 
Dimitriou, Tatiana-Danai
Tsolaki, Magdalini

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Phototherapy