Physical Education and Training

Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

BACKGROUND: Telomerase activity is a predictor of long-term cellular viability, which decreases with chronic psychological distress (Epel et al., 2004). Buddhist traditions claim that meditation decreases psychological distress and promotes well-being (e.g., Dalai Lama and Cutler, 2009). Therefore, we investigated the effects of a 3-month meditation retreat on telomerase activity and two major contributors to the experience of stress: Perceived Control (associated with decreased stress) and Neuroticism (associated with increased subjective distress).

Author(s): 
Jacobs, Tonya L.
Epel, Elissa S.
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Wolkowitz, Owen M.
Bridwell, David A.
Zanesco, Anthony P.
Aichele, Stephen R.
Sahdra, Baljinder K.
MacLean, Katherine A.
King, Brandon G.
Shaver, Phillip R.
Rosenberg, Erika L.
Ferrer, Emilio
Wallace, B. Alan
Saron, Clifford D.
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

BACKGROUND: Telomerase activity is a predictor of long-term cellular viability, which decreases with chronic psychological distress (Epel et al., 2004). Buddhist traditions claim that meditation decreases psychological distress and promotes well-being (e.g., Dalai Lama and Cutler, 2009). Therefore, we investigated the effects of a 3-month meditation retreat on telomerase activity and two major contributors to the experience of stress: Perceived Control (associated with decreased stress) and Neuroticism (associated with increased subjective distress).

Author(s): 
Jacobs, Tonya L.
Epel, Elissa S.
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Wolkowitz, Owen M.
Bridwell, David A.
Zanesco, Anthony P.
Aichele, Stephen R.
Sahdra, Baljinder K.
MacLean, Katherine A.
King, Brandon G.
Shaver, Phillip R.
Rosenberg, Erika L.
Ferrer, Emilio
Wallace, B. Alan
Saron, Clifford D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

The purpose of this study is to explore spirituality within the Health and Physical Education (HPE) learning area, through investigating children's experiences within three Brisbane Catholic Education primary schools (Queensland, Australia). There are seven dimensions of wellness: physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, environmental, and occupational, which are all strongly connected (Robbins et al. in A wellness way of life, 9th edition, McGraw Hill, USA, 2011).

Author(s): 
Lynch, Timothy
Publication Title: 
Minerva Medica
Author(s): 
Calderaro, G.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology

Little information is available concerning the influence of subconscious mechanisms on neuroendocrine function, more specifically, proenkephalin peptide F release. Ten men [5 middle distance runners (21.6 (SD 0.54 years) and 5 untrained men (24.0 (SD 4.3 years)] consented to be volunteers in this investigation. Submaximal exercise intensities of 25% and 50% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2) (8 min stages) were used for both the control and hypnosis treatments.

Author(s): 
Kraemer, W. J.
Lewis, R. V.
Triplett, N. T.
Koziris, L. P.
Heyman, S.
Noble, B. J.
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Sports Medicine

Hypnosis is a procedure during which a mental health professional suggests that a patient experience changes in sensations, perceptions, thoughts, or behavior. The purpose of this article is to briefly describe the use of various methods of relaxation, hypnosis, and imagery techniques available to enhance athletic performance. The characteristics that these techniques have in common include relaxation, suggestibility, concentration, imaginative ability, reality testing, brain function, autonomic control, and placebo effect. Case studies are provided for illustration.

Author(s): 
Newmark, Thomas S.
Bogacki, David F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP

OBJECTIVE: To test feasibility of yoga within a high school curriculum and evaluate preventive efficacy for psychosocial well-being. METHODS: Grade 11 or 12 students (N = 51) who registered for physical education (PE) were cluster-randomized by class 2:1 yoga:PE-as-usual. A Kripalu-based yoga program of physical postures, breathing exercises, relaxation, and meditation was taught 2 to 3 times a week for 10 weeks. Self-report questionnaires were administered to students 1 week before and after.

Author(s): 
Noggle, Jessica J.
Steiner, Naomi J.
Minami, Takuya
Khalsa, Sat Bir S.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness

LDH is a glycolytic enzyme utilised during exercise to provide energy to contracting muscles. Chronic submaximal exercise for a longer duration shows about two-fold increase in LDH levels. Yogic practises might be bringing similar effects. The present work was designed to study effect of yogic training on LDH levels. Fourteen female and six male students of average age or 18 years were subjected to yogic training for six weeks. Serum LDH levels were found before and after the training course by spectrophotometric method of Henry et al.

Author(s): 
Pansare, M. S.
Kulkarni, A. N.
Pendse, U. B.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Cardiology

This study reports the physiologic effects of up to 14 months of aerobic exercise in 101 older (greater than 60 years) men and women. After an extensive baseline physiologic assessment (Time 1), in which aerobic capacity and blood lipids were measured, subjects were randomized to an aerobic exercise condition (cycle ergometry, 3 times per week for 1 hour), nonaerobic yoga (2 times per week for 1 hour), or a waiting list nonexercise control group for 4 months, and then underwent a second (Time 2) assessment.

Author(s): 
Blumenthal, J. A.
Emery, C. F.
Madden, D. J.
Coleman, R. E.
Riddle, M. W.
Schniebolk, S.
Cobb, F. R.
Sullivan, M. J.
Higginbotham, M. B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of up to 14 months of aerobic exercise on measures of bone density in older adults. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial with subjects assigned to either an aerobic exercise condition, non-aerobic yoga, or a wait list non-exercise control group for 4 months. Aerobic fitness and bone density were evaluated in all subjects at baseline (Time 1) and after 4 months (Time 2). A semi-crossover design was utilized with all subjects completing 4 months of aerobic exercise, followed by another evaluation (Time 3).

Author(s): 
Blumenthal, J. A.
Emery, C. F.
Madden, D. J.
Schniebolk, S.
Riddle, M. W.
Cobb, F. R.
Higginbotham, M.
Coleman, R. E.

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