Physical Exertion

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

The meta-analysis of homeopathy trials that appeared in the Lancet in 1997 seemed to endorse the experience of practitioners and patients that homeopathic medicines have specific clinically relevant effects.

Author(s): 
Dean, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cellular Physiology

Oxidative stress results from damage to tissues caused by free radicals and is increased by exercise. Peroxiredoxins (PRXs) maintain the cellular reducing environment by scavenging intracellular hydrogen peroxide. It has been recently noted that physical exercise has a positive effect on the PRX system, exerting a protective effect against oxidative stress-induced damage. However, other compounds, such as sestrins (SESNs), a stress-inducible protein family with antioxidant properties, should also be considered in the function of PRXs.

Author(s): 
Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian
Publication Title: 
Dental Clinics of North America

In the late 1960's, preventive health care began to gain in popularity in the United States and the movement carried over into the 1970's. During this time, sizable decreases in deaths from heart disease, strokes, and accidents have been noted. As a result, the lowest death rate in the history of this country (8.9 per 1000) occurred in both 1975 and 1976. Since 1970, an increase in longevity has been documented and it can be said that Americans are living longer--not just longer but hopefully better!

Author(s): 
Cooper, K. H.
Christen, A. G.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills

Of the 75 patients in the February 1977 "class" at the Longevity Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California, 11 volunteers were pre- and posttested (21- to 23-day intervals) with the MMPI, 13 with the California Psychological Inventory, and 17 with four subtests of the WAIS (total: 21 males, 10 females). Ten of the (total) 32 scales showed changes in the predicted, favorable direction, statistically significant at the .05 level or better by t test.

Author(s): 
Merzbacher, C. F.
Publication Title: 
British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Ed.)
Author(s): 
Doll, R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Gerontology

Data were obtained from 70 individuals (M age = 78.7, SE = 4.1 years) who attended the Pritikin Longevity Center's 26-day residential program where they were exposed to a high-complex-carbohydrate, low-fat diet, and daily exercise. During the 26-day program, serum cholesterol was reduced from 222 (SE = 5) to 179 (SE = 5) mg/dl, and triglycerides were reduced from 156 (SE = 10) to 141 (SE = 7) mg/dl. Body weight was reduced an average of 2.2 kg. Treadmill performance increased from 3.7 (SE = .1) to 5.5 (SE = .2) METs.

Author(s): 
Weber, F.
Barnard, R. J.
Roy, D.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Aging & Human Development

The health, illness, and life styles of the oldest Palauans were investigated by interview and examination in their homes. Thirty-eight citizens ranged in age from 86 to 111. Ten were 100 years or older. They were in unusually good physical and mental health. The most common physical problem is arthritis. Life style is described in terms of diet, physical activity, smoking and drinking habits, use of medical services, and living conditions.

Author(s): 
Jensen, G. D.
Polloi, A. H.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Medicine

Recent studies have implicated elevated levels of serum estradiol in males as the major predisposing factor for myocardial infarction, with serum cholesterol playing a secondary role. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a high-complex-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet and daily exercise on levels of serum estradiol, testosterone, and lipids in males. Twenty-one males participating in the Pritikin Longevity Center 26-day residential program volunteered for the study.

Author(s): 
Rosenthal, M. B.
Barnard, R. J.
Rose, D. P.
Inkeles, S.
Hall, J.
Pritikin, N.
Publication Title: 
The New England Journal of Medicine
Author(s): 
Schneider, E. L.
Reed, J. D.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Hardly an aspect of aging is more important than an organism's ability to withstand stress or to resist both internally and externally imposed insults. We know that as organisms loose their ability to resist these insults, aged organisms suffer more than the young. Therefore, a prime strategy for an organism's survival has been the evolutionarily adapted defense systems that guard against insult. For better survivability, an organism's defense system must be maximized to its full effect through well-coordinated networks of diverse biologically responsive elements.

Author(s): 
Yu, B. P.
Chung, H. Y.

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