Physician's Practice Patterns

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: Reported cases of multiple personality disorder have increased dramatically in the last decade. Few data are available on the treatment of multiple personality disorder. Current recommendations are based on the experience of individual clinicians rather than on systematic research. METHOD: A questionnaire study of 305 clinicians representing a spectrum of mental health professionals was conducted to survey the types and relative efficacy of treatment modalities currently used with cases of multiple personality disorder.

Author(s): 
Putnam, F. W.
Loewenstein, R. J.
Publication Title: 
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne

OBJECTIVE: To determine the referral practices, perceived usefulness, knowledge, prior training and desire for training of general practitioners (GPs) in Quebec with regard to complementary health care services such as acupuncture, chiropractic and hypnosis. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mail survey. SETTING: Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 200 GPs. Of the 146 who responded, 25 were excluded because they were no longer in practice; this left 121 (83%).

Author(s): 
Goldszmidt, M.
Levitt, C.
Duarte-Franco, E.
Kaczorowski, J.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To assess (1) pediatricians' attitudes toward and practice of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their patients; (2) their knowledge, experience, and referral patterns for selected CAM therapies; and (3) their desire for continuing medical education courses on CAM therapies. METHOD: An anonymous, self-report, 25-item questionnaire was mailed to fellows of the Michigan chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Author(s): 
Sikand, A.
Laken, M.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Diamond, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitudes and referral patterns of general practitioners (GPs) toward 10 specific complementary therapies. METHOD: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional postal survey, conducted between July 1998 and August 1998 inclusive. A random selection of 200 male and 200 female Western Australian GPs residing in Perth and listed in the Australian Medical Association database file of registered GPs. RESULTS: The response rate was 74.8% (n = 282).

Author(s): 
Hall, K.
Giles-Corti, B.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: Assessing the extent to which general practitioners (GPs) accept complementary therapies as normal medical practice. DESIGN: An examination of two Australian surveys of GPs undertaken in Tasmania and Victoria in 1997. OUTCOME MEASURES: Type of referral (to doctors or non-medical therapists) and therapy. Levels of acceptance. Basis for judgement of acceptability. RESULTS: In Tasmania 66% of GPs referred patients to doctors - primarily for acupuncture and hypnotherapy.

Author(s): 
Easthope, G.
Tranter, B.
Gill, G.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

With the increasing demand and usage of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by the general public, it is vital that healthcare professionals can make informed decisions when advising or referring their patients who wish to use CAM. Therefore they might benefit from advice by CAM-providers as to which treatment can be recommended for which condition. AIM: The primary aim of this survey was to determine which complementary therapies are believed by their respective representing professional organizations to be suited for which medical conditions.

Author(s): 
Long, L.
Huntley, A.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

Clinical hypnosis is a skill of using words and gestures (frequently called suggestions) in particular ways to achieve specific outcomes. It is being increasingly recognised as a useful intervention for managing a range of symptoms, especially pain and anxiety. We surveyed all 317 South Australian Fellows and trainees registered with ANZCA to determine their use, knowledge of, and attitudes towards positive suggestion, hypnosis and hypnotherapy in their anaesthesia practice. The response rate was 218 anaesthetists (69%).

Author(s): 
Coldrey, J. C.
Cyna, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities. DESIGN: A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs. RESULTS: Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey.

Author(s): 
Lin, Yuan-Chi
Lee, Anne C. C.
Kemper, Kathi J.
Berde, Charles B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

METHODS: Australian general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward and use of a range of complementary therapies (CTs) were determined through a self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 2000 Australian GPs. The survey canvassed GPs' opinions as to the harmfulness and effectiveness of CTs; current levels of training and interest in further training; personal use of, and use in practice of, CTs; referrals to CT; practitioners; appropriateness for GPs to practice and for government regulation; perceived patient demand and the need for undergraduate education.

Author(s): 
Cohen, Marc M.
Penman, Stephen
Pirotta, Marie
Da Costa, Cliff

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