Physicians, Women

Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Physicians' religious attributes are unknown, and may affect patient care. The Women Physicians' Health Study (WPHS) is a random sample (n = 4501 respondents, 59% response rate) of US women physicians aged 30-70; the first large, national study of US women physicians. In this study US women physicians were less likely to be Christian than were other Americans (61.2% of women physicians versus 85.1% of the general population), but were more likely to be Jewish (13.2% vs 2.0%), Buddhist (1.4% vs 0.3%), Hindu (3.9% vs 0.4%), or atheist/agnostic (5.9% vs 0.6%).

Author(s): 
Frank, E.
Dell, M. L.
Chopp, R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Biography

Letitia Fairfield - doctor, lawyer, public health worker, feminist and war worker - was a woman of surprising contradictions. She displayed some eccentric tendencies that sometimes did not sit comfortably with her role as a medical professional; she was, for example, a believer in witchcraft and a convert to Roman Catholicism. However, she made great contributions to medicine throughout her active career and did so during a period in which female access to medical education was limited. Few of her female or male peers received such respect or oversaw such change.

Author(s): 
Garrett, Emily
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

The last five decades of the American cinema have produced a remarkably consistent stereotype of the female analyst. In films such as Spellbound (1945), Knock on Wood (1954), Sex and the Single Girl (1964), They Might be Giants (1971), and The Man Who Loved Women (1983), women analysts are swept away by countertransference love that leads them to become sexually or romantically involved with their male patients.

Author(s): 
Gabbard, G. O.
Gabbard, K.
Publication Title: 
History of Psychiatry

In 1935 Constance Pascal (1877-1937), France's first woman psychiatrist, published Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (The Sorrows of Love and Psychosis). My analysis of her monograph will consider: her major article leading up to Chagrins; Pascal's debts to her predecessors, particularly Morel and Kretschmer; her relationship to the French psychoanalytic movement; her co-option of psychoanalysis as a tool in her own therapeutic work with patients in the state psychiatric system; and her social/cultural interpretations of her woman patients.

Author(s): 
Gordon, Felicia
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To identify the factors lesbian women find important in selecting a family physician and to describe their attitudes toward the sex of a physician. To determine their attitudes about disclosure of sexual orientation to physicians, their fears upon disclosing, and their actual experiences with disclosure. DESIGN: Anonymous, self-administered, written questionnaire survey of lesbians in the Fraser Valley. SETTING: Lesbian community in the Fraser Valley.

Author(s): 
Geddes, V. A.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To identify the factors lesbian women find important in selecting a family physician and to describe their attitudes toward the sex of a physician. To determine their attitudes about disclosure of sexual orientation to physicians, their fears upon disclosing, and their actual experiences with disclosure. DESIGN: Anonymous, self-administered, written questionnaire survey of lesbians in the Fraser Valley. SETTING: Lesbian community in the Fraser Valley.

Author(s): 
Geddes, V. A.
Publication Title: 
Medicinski Pregled

INTRODUCTION: 90 years ago, on November 26th, 1917, died Dr. Elsie Inglis, one of the greatest heroines of the First World War, founder and driving force of the famous "Scottish Women's Hospitals", and one of the most interesting persons in the history of medicine in general, and especially in Serbia where she and her hospitals were of the greatest help in the most difficult times.

Author(s): 
Miki?, Zelimir
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Medical Association

BACKGROUND: A less-publicized consequence of the civil rights movement in the mid-20th century is the door of opportunity it provided for African-American women to become neurosurgeons, beginning in 1984 with Alexa I. Canady (University of Minnesota). Unfortunately, the exploits of a contemporary African-American woman neurosurgeon, M. Deborrah Hyde, have remained largely in obscurity. This report details the career and exploits of Hyde, one of the first women to receive neurosurgery training in Ohio.

Author(s): 
McClelland, Shearwood
Publication Title: 
Psychological Reports

This study was designed to investigate the personality profile of positive role models in medicine. Participants were a national sample of 188 physicians (164 men, 24 women) who had been nominated by the chief executive officers of their institutions as positive role models and who completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory.

Author(s): 
Magee, M.
Hojat, M.
Publication Title: 
Dynamis (Granada, Spain)

The development of philosophical medicine in the high and late Middle Ages brought with it a powerful association of medical knowledge with the written word. To possess books, or at least to have access to books, was both a prerequisite for and a symbol of the kind of theoretical learning that distinguished the learned practitioner from the empiric. This study examines evidence for women's access to medical books, raising the question of what difference gender made. I argue that, for the most part, women did not own medical books, whether they were laywomen or religious.

Author(s): 
Green, M. H.

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