Phytotherapy

Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, the Cochrane Library and previous review papers. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of each treatment, the rationale behind the treatment, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Rodgers, Bryan
Publication Title: 
Swiss Medical Weekly

OBJECTIVE: An increasing number of patients with asthma are attracted by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Therefore, it is of importance that scientific evidence about the efficacy of this type of therapy is regarded. METHOD: We searched the electronic databases Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library for controlled trials and systematic reviews to evaluate the evidence of the most popular alternative therapies, i.e. acupuncture, homeopathy, breathing techniques, herbal and nutritional therapies.

Author(s): 
Steurer-Stey, Claudia
Russi, Erich W.
Steurer, Johann
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

This paper considers the problem of evaluating multimodal integrative medicine treatments for complex pathologic conditions. The example is given of evaluation of highly successful treatments of lymphedema using Ayurvedic and Yoga medicine practices together with modern medicine. For a framework to evaluate such a complex intervention, we base our proposal on Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines.

Author(s): 
Narahari, Saravu R.
Ryan, Terence J.
Aggithaya, Madhur Guruprasad
Bose, Kuttaje S.
Prasanna, Kodimoole S.
Publication Title: 
Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946)

Many hypertensive patients try complementary/alternative medicine for blood pressure control. Based on extensive electronic literature searches, the evidence from clinical trials is summarised. Numerous herbal remedies, non-herbal remedies and other approaches have been tested and some seem to have antihypertensive effects. The effect size is usually modest, and independent replications are frequently missing. The most encouraging data pertain to garlic, autogenic training, biofeedback and yoga. More research is required before firm recommendations can be offered.

Author(s): 
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) partnered to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of depressive disorders. A revision of these guidelines was undertaken by CANMAT in 2008-2009 to reflect advances in the field. There is widespread interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians.

Author(s): 
Ravindran, Arun V.
Lam, Raymond W.
Filteau, Marie J.
Lespérance, François
Kennedy, Sidney H.
Parikh, Sagar V.
Patten, Scott B.
Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT)
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Author(s): 
Shen, Yi-Hao A.
Nahas, Richard
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Author(s): 
Shen, Yi-Hao A.
Nahas, Richard
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Author(s): 
Shen, Yi-Hao A.
Nahas, Richard
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Psychiatry

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is well documented evidence for the increasing widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of physical and psychiatric symptoms and disorders within Western populations. Here we provide a review of the recent literature on evidence for using such interventions in the treatment of anxiety and depression. RECENT FINDINGS: With regard to herbal treatments, kava is effective in reducing anxiety symptoms and St John's wort in treating mild to moderate depression.

Author(s): 
van der Watt, Gill
Laugharne, Jonathan
Janca, Aleksandar
Publication Title: 
Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVE: To review available evidence about the effectiveness of alternative therapies for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and 13 additional US and international data bases were searched in 1996-1997 for papers that described use of alternative medicine in the treatment of pregnancy and pregnancy complications, specifically those addressing nausea, vomiting, and hyperemesis. Bibliographies of retrieved papers were reviewed to identify additional sources. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: All relevant English language clinical research papers were reviewed.

Author(s): 
Aikins Murphy, P.

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