Plant Extracts

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the scientific evidence on guggul for hyperlipidemia including expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing. METHODS: Electronic searches were conducted in nine databases, 20 additional journals (not indexed in common databases), and bibliographies from 50 selected secondary references. No restrictions were placed on language or quality of publications.

Author(s): 
Ulbricht, Catherine
Basch, Ethan
Szapary, Philippe
Hammerness, Paul
Axentsev, Serguei
Boon, Heather
Kroll, David
Garraway, Levi
Vora, Mamta
Woods, Jen
Natural Standard Research Collaboration
Publication Title: 
Sleep Medicine Reviews

In concert with growing public interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), these therapies and products have been increasingly studied over the past two decades for the treatment of sleep disorders. While systematic reviews have been conducted on acupuncture and valerian in the treatment of insomnia, to date no comprehensive review has been conducted on all major CAM treatments.

Author(s): 
Sarris, Jerome
Byrne, Gerard J.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

The use of herbal medicine is widespread and growing, with as many as 3 in 10 Americans using botanical remedies in a given year. Because many herbal medicines have significant pharmacological activity, and thus potential adverse effects and drug interactions, healthcare professionals must be familiar with this therapeutic modality. This article summarizes the history and current use of plant-based medicine and highlights the evidence of the risks and benefits associated with 6 plants: echinacea, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, St John's wort, and valerian.

Author(s): 
Barrett, B.
Kiefer, D.
Rabago, D.
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Psychiatry

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is well documented evidence for the increasing widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of physical and psychiatric symptoms and disorders within Western populations. Here we provide a review of the recent literature on evidence for using such interventions in the treatment of anxiety and depression. RECENT FINDINGS: With regard to herbal treatments, kava is effective in reducing anxiety symptoms and St John's wort in treating mild to moderate depression.

Author(s): 
van der Watt, Gill
Laugharne, Jonathan
Janca, Aleksandar
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

The use of herbal medicine is widespread and growing, with as many as 3 in 10 Americans using botanical remedies in a given year. Because many herbal medicines have significant pharmacological activity, and thus potential adverse effects and drug interactions, healthcare professionals must be familiar with this therapeutic modality. This article summarizes the history and current use of plant-based medicine and highlights the evidence of the risks and benefits associated with 6 plants: echinacea, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, St John's wort, and valerian.

Author(s): 
Barrett, B.
Kiefer, D.
Rabago, D.
Publication Title: 
Drug Safety

Crataegus spp. (hawthorn) monopreparations are predominantly used for treating congestive heart failure. The effectiveness of hawthorn preparations (flowers with leaves; berries) is documented in a number of clinical studies, reviews and meta-analyses. The aim of this article is to assess the safety data of all available human studies on hawthorn monopreparations. Systematic searches were conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, The Cochrane Library, the UK National Research Register and the US ClinicalTrials.gov (up to January 2005).

Author(s): 
Daniele, Claudia
Mazzanti, Gabriela
Pittler, Max H.
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of herbal medicine compared with placebo, no intervention, or "standard/accepted/conventional treatments" for nonspecific low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Low back pain is a common condition and a substantial economic burden in industrialized societies. A large proportion of patients with chronic low back pain use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and/or visit CAM practitioners. Several herbal medicines have been purported for use in low back pain.

Author(s): 
Gagnier, Joel J.
van Tulder, Maurits W.
Berman, Brian
Bombardier, Claire
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Drug Safety

Vitex agnus castus L. (VAC) [Verbenaceae] is a deciduous shrub that is native to Mediterranean Europe and Central Asia. Traditionally, VAC fruit extract has been used in the treatment of many female conditions, including menstrual disorders (amenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), corpus luteum insufficiency, hyperprolactinaemia, infertility, acne, menopause and disrupted lactation. The German Commission E has approved the use of VAC for irregularities of the menstrual cycle, premenstrual disturbances and mastodynia.

Author(s): 
Daniele, Claudia
Thompson Coon, Joanna
Pittler, Max H.
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the homeopathic medicine Arnica D30 has an effect on muscle soreness and cell damage after marathon running. METHODS: The subjects were 82 marathon runners from two separate randomised double-blind placebo controlled trials participating in the Oslo Marathon in 1990 and 1995. Five pills of Arnica D30 or placebo were given morning and evening. Treatment started on the evening before the marathon and continued on day of the race and the three following days. The runners assessed muscular soreness on a visual analogue scale.

Author(s): 
Tveiten, D.
Bruset, S.

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