Plant Proteins

Publication Title: 
Molecular genetics and genomics: MGG

Self-incompatibility in the genus Prunus is controlled by two genes at the S-locus, S-RNase and SFB. Both genes exhibit the high polymorphism and high sequence diversity characteristic of plant self-incompatibility systems. Deduced polypeptide sequences of three myrobalan and three domestic plum S-RNases showed over 97% identity with S-RNases from other Prunus species, including almond, sweet cherry, Japanese apricot and Japanese plum. The second intron, which is generally highly polymorphic between alleles was also remarkably well conserved within these S-allele pairs.

Author(s): 
Sutherland, Bruce G.
Tobutt, Kenneth R.
Robbins, Timothy P.
Publication Title: 
Plant Physiology

Root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne species are major polyphagous pests of most crops worldwide, and cultivars with durable resistance are urgently needed because of nematicide bans. The Ma gene from the Myrobalan plum (Prunus cerasifera) confers complete-spectrum, heat-stable, and high-level resistance to RKN, which is remarkable in comparison with the Mi-1 gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the sole RKN resistance gene cloned. We report here the positional cloning and the functional validation of the Ma locus present at the heterozygous state in the P.2175 accession.

Author(s): 
Claverie, Michel
Dirlewanger, Elisabeth
Bosselut, Nathalie
Van Ghelder, Cyril
Voisin, Roger
Kleinhentz, Marc
Lafargue, Bernard
Abad, Pierre
Rosso, Marie-Noëlle
Chalhoub, Boulos
Esmenjaud, Daniel
Publication Title: 
Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry

Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation. In this study, an ACE-hexapeptide inhibitor (Asp-Glu-Asn-Ser-Lys-Phe) designated as chebulin was produced from the fruit protein of Terminalia chebula Retz. by pepsin digestion, ultrafiltrated through a 3 KDa cut-off membrane, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chebulin was found to inhibit ACE in a noncompetitive manner, as supported by the structural model.

Author(s): 
Sornwatana, Thakorn
Bangphoomi, Kunan
Roytrakul, Sittiruk
Wetprasit, Nuanchawee
Choowongkomon, Kiattawee
Ratanapo, Sunanta
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

P. anserina mutants with impairments in complex IV (COX) of the respiratory chain are characterized by an increase in lifespan. Examples are the nuclear grisea mutant with a moderate lifespan extension (60%) and the immortal extranuclear ex1 mutant. Here we report data demonstrating that in mutant ex1 the level of the alternative oxidase (PaAOX) is significantly higher than in mutant grisea. PaAOX levels appear to be reversely dependent on COX activity.

Author(s): 
Borghouts, Corina
Scheckhuber, Christian Q.
Werner, Alexandra
Osiewacz, Heinz D.
Publication Title: 
Molecular genetics and genomics: MGG

The heat shock factor (HSF), a protein evolutionarily conserved from yeasts to human, regulates the expression of a set of proteins called heat shock proteins (HSPs), many of which function as molecular chaperones. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HSF binds to the 5' upstream region of YGR146C and activates its transcription. YGR146C encodes a functional homolog of ecl1 (+), ecl2 (+), and ecl3 (+) of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. At present, these Ecl1 family genes, which are extenders of chronological lifespan, have been identified only in fungi groups.

Author(s): 
Ohtsuka, Hokuto
Azuma, Kenko
Murakami, Hiroshi
Aiba, Hirofumi
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

The relationship of nutrient intakes to life expectancies in Japan since the Second World War has demonstrated that sufficient intakes of animal protein and fat are crucial for attaining longevity. In the community dwelling elderly, the higher the serum albumin was, the longer the further life expectancy in the elderly. Serum total cholesterol showed a U-shape relationship to further life expectancies in the elderly. Low serum cholesterol was deleterious for higher levels of functional capacity.

Author(s): 
Shibata, H.
Publication Title: 
FEBS letters

Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide derived from the plant Artemisia annua, forms the basis of the most important treatments of malaria in use today. In an effort to elucidate the biosynthesis of artemisinin, an expressed sequence tag approach to identifying the relevant biosynthetic genes was undertaken using isolated glandular trichomes as a source of mRNA.

Author(s): 
Teoh, Keat H.
Polichuk, Devin R.
Reed, Darwin W.
Nowak, Goska
Covello, Patrick S.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

At some point during biosynthesis of the antimalarial artemisinin in glandular trichomes of Artemisia annua, the Delta11(13) double bond originating in amorpha-4,11-diene is reduced. This is thought to occur in artemisinic aldehyde, but other intermediates have been suggested. In an effort to understand double bond reduction in artemisinin biosynthesis, extracts of A. annua flower buds were investigated and found to contain artemisinic aldehyde Delta11(13) double bond reductase activity.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Yansheng
Teoh, Keat H.
Reed, Darwin W.
Maes, Lies
Goossens, Alain
Olson, Douglas J. H.
Ross, Andrew R. S.
Covello, Patrick S.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration.

Author(s): 
van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.
Cankar, Katarina
Nogueira, Marilise
Bosch, Dirk
Bouwmeester, Harro J.
Beekwilder, Jules
Publication Title: 
BMC plant biology

BACKGROUND: Recently, Artemisia annua L. (annual or sweet wormwood) has received increasing attention due to the fact that the plant produces the sesquiterpenoid endoperoxide artemisinin, which today is widely used for treatment of malaria. The plant produces relatively small amounts of artemisinin and a worldwide shortage of the drug has led to intense research in order to increase the yield of artemisinin.

Author(s): 
Olofsson, Linda
Engström, Alexander
Lundgren, Anneli
Brodelius, Peter E.

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