Population Groups

Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Public health literature indicates that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic disease development. However, there is scant research on the health effects of stress for minority groups, who suffer from a high burden of chronic disease. This paper provides a review of studies that examine the relationship between psychosocial stress and chronic disease for 4th world indigenous groups and African Americans. A total of 50 associational and 15 intervention studies fit the inclusion criteria for this review.

Author(s): 
Paradies, Yin
Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Public health literature indicates that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic disease development. However, there is scant research on the health effects of stress for minority groups, who suffer from a high burden of chronic disease. This paper provides a review of studies that examine the relationship between psychosocial stress and chronic disease for 4th world indigenous groups and African Americans. A total of 50 associational and 15 intervention studies fit the inclusion criteria for this review.

Author(s): 
Paradies, Yin
Publication Title: 
African journal of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines: AJTCAM

Diabetes mellitus is an endocrinological disorder arising from insulin deficiency or due to ineffectiveness of the insulin produced by the body. This results in high blood glucose and with time, to neurological, cardiovascular, retinal and renal complications. It is a debilitating disease and affects the population of every country of the world. Around 200 million people of the world suffer from this disease and this figure is projected to rise to 300 million in the coming years.

Author(s): 
Rahmatullah, Mohammed
Azam, Md Nur Kabidul
Khatun, Zubaida
Seraj, Syeda
Islam, Farhana
Rahman, Md Atiqur
Jahan, Sharmin
Aziz, Md Shah
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: There is very limited information regarding plants used by traditional healers in Rangamati, Bangladesh, for treating general ailments. Current study provides significant ethnopharmacological information, both qualitative and quantitative on medical plants in Rangamati. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study aimed to collect, analyze and evaluate the rich ethnopharmacologic knowledge on medicinal plants in Rangamati and attempted to identify the important species used in traditional medicine.

Author(s): 
Kadir, Mohammad Fahim
Bin Sayeed, Muhammad Shahdaat
Mia, M. M. K.
Publication Title: 
Biochemistry. Biokhimii?a

In the late seventies, a small tribal population of Paraguay, the Ache, living under natural conditions, was studied. Data from this population turn out to be useful for considerations about evolutionary hypotheses on the aging phenomenon. 1) Ache show an age-related increasing mortality, which strongly limits the mean duration of life, as observed in other studies on mammal and bird species. 2) According to current theories on aging, in the wild very few or no individual reach old age and, so, aging cannot be directly influenced by natural selection.

Author(s): 
Libertini, G.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Human Biology: The Official Journal of the Human Biology Council

Researchers have shown interest in the relation between (a) social capital and individual income and (b) the individual health of people of industrial nations. The socioeconomic complexity of industrial nations makes it difficult to arrive at firm conclusions. We circumvent the obstacle by using data from a small-scale rural society of foragers-farmers in the Bolivian Amazon (Tsimane'). We examine the interactions between the outcome (BMI) and relative income, relative social capital, village income, and village social capital.

Author(s): 
Brabec, Marek
Godoy, Ricardo
Reyes-GarcÌa, Victoria
Leonard, William R.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

OBJECTIVE: UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 are involved in the metabolism of antimalarial dihydroartemisinin and antiretroviral zidovudine. Our aim was to analyze the prevalence of UGT1A9 (chromosome 2) and UGT2B7 (chromosome 4) nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in West African (WA), Papua New Guinean (PNG), and North American (NA) populations.

Author(s): 
Mehlotra, Rajeev K.
Bockarie, Moses J.
Zimmerman, Peter A.
Publication Title: 
African journal of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines: AJTCAM / African Networks on Ethnomedicines

The Kanda tribe is one of the lesser known small tribes of Bangladesh with an estimated population of about 1700 people (according to them), and on the verge of extinction as a separate entity. To some extent, they have assimilated with the surrounding mainstream Bengali-speaking population, but they still maintain their cultural practices including traditional medicinal practices, for which they have their own tribal healers. Nothing at all has been documented thus far about their traditional medicinal practices and formulations, which are on the verge of disappearance.

Author(s): 
Rahmatullah, Mohammed
Ayman, Umma
Akter, Fatema
Sarker, Mridul
Sifa, Rolee
Sarker, Bijoy
Chyti, Humayra Naj
Jahan, Farhana Israt
Chowdhury, Majeedul H.
Chowdhury, Soheli A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology

Asymptomatic infection by Plasmodium falciparum is an important obstacle to eliminating malaria. Asymptomatic carriers do not seek treatment for infection, and therefore they become a reservoir for the parasite. For this reason, these carriers pose a real public health risk. The systematic identification and treatment of asymptomatic infections should reduce the parasite reservoir. A large reduction in this pool will lower the chance of transmission of the disease.

Author(s): 
Ganguly, Swagata
Saha, Pabitra
Guha, Subhasish K.
Biswas, Asit
Das, Sonali
Kundu, Pratip K.
Maji, Ardhendu K.
Publication Title: 
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion

Using data from a 2001–2002 sample of adults aged 65 and older living in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, we examine the associations among religious involvement (as measured by the frequency of attendance at religious services and praying), the belief in divine control, and the sense of mattering—a key component of the self-concept. We also assess the extent to which these patterns vary by gender, race, and education. Findings indicate indirect effects of religious attendance on mattering through divine control beliefs and the frequency of social contact.

Author(s): 
Schieman, Scott
Bierman, Alex
Ellison, Christopher G.

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