Postural Balance

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling is common in older people and associated with serious physical and psychosocial consequences. Exercise (planned, structured, repetitive and purposive physical activity aimed at improving physical fitness) may reduce fear of falling by improving strength, gait, balance and mood, and reducing the occurrence of falls. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits, harms and costs) of exercise interventions for reducing fear of falling in older people living in the community.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Denise
Kumar, Arun
Carpenter, Hannah
Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt
Skelton, Dawn A.
Cook, Juliette R.
Stevens, Zoe
Belcher, Carolyn M.
Haworth, Deborah
Gawler, Sheena J.
Gage, Heather
Masud, Tahir
Bowling, Ann
Pearl, Mirilee
Morris, Richard W.
Iliffe, Steve
Delbaere, Kim
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review was done of the evidence on yoga for improving balance. DESIGN: Relevant articles and reviews were identified in major databases (PubMed, MEDLINE(®), IndMed, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, EBSCO, Science Direct, and Google Scholar), and their reference lists searched. Key search words were yoga, balance, proprioception, falling, fear of falling, and falls. Included studies were peer-reviewed articles published in English before June 2012, using healthy populations. All yoga styles and study designs were included.

Author(s): 
Jeter, Pamela E.
Nkodo, Amélie-Françoise
Moonaz, Steffany Haaz
Dagnelie, Gislin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Interest in yoga is growing, especially among older adults. This review critically summarizes the current literature to investigate whether physical fitness and function benefits are engendered through the practice of yoga in older adults. A comprehensive search yielded 507 studies; 10 studies with 544 participants (69.6 ± 6.3 yr, 71% female) were included. Large variability in yoga styles and measurement outcomes make it challenging to interpret results across studies.

Author(s): 
Roland, Kaitlyn P.
Jakobi, Jennifer M.
Jones, Gareth R.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: In older adults, diminished balance is associated with reduced physical functioning and an increased risk of falling. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people, aged 60 and over, living in the community or in institutional care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (to February 2011).

Author(s): 
Howe, Tracey E.
Rochester, Lynn
Neil, Fiona
Skelton, Dawn A.
Ballinger, Claire
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

OBJECTIVE: one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall annually. Exercise that challenges balance is proven to prevent falls. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on balance and physical mobility in people aged 60+ years. METHODS: searches for relevant trials were conducted on the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to February 2015.

Author(s): 
Youkhana, Sabrina
Dean, Catherine M.
Wolff, Moa
Sherrington, Catherine
Tiedemann, Anne
Publication Title: 
WMJ: official publication of the State Medical Society of Wisconsin

The majority of studies on Tai Chi conducted between 1996 and 2004 had focused on health and well being of Tai Chi exercise for senior adults. The results show that Tai Chi may lead to improved balance, reduced fear of falling, increased strength, increased functional mobility, greater flexibility, and increased psychological well-being, sleep enhancement for sleep disturbed elderly individuals, and increased cardio functioning.

Author(s): 
Kuramoto, Alice M.
Publication Title: 
Western Journal of Nursing Research

Initiation and maintenance of physical activity (PA) in older adults is of increasing concern as the benefits of PA have been shown to improve physical functioning, mood, weight, and cardiovascular risk factors. Meditative movement forms of PA, such as tai chi and qigong (TC & QG), are holistic in nature and have increased in popularity over the past few decades. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated TC & QG interventions from multiple perspectives, specifically targeting older adults.

Author(s): 
Rogers, Carol E.
Larkey, Linda K.
Keller, Colleen
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

OBJECTIVE: one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall annually. Exercise that challenges balance is proven to prevent falls. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on balance and physical mobility in people aged 60+ years. METHODS: searches for relevant trials were conducted on the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to February 2015.

Author(s): 
Youkhana, Sabrina
Dean, Catherine M.
Wolff, Moa
Sherrington, Catherine
Tiedemann, Anne
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.

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