Practice Patterns, Physicians'

Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Rhode Island Medical Journal (2013)

There is increasing interest in the use of yoga as way to manage or treat depression and anxiety. Yoga is afford- able, appealing, and accessible for many people, and there are plausible cognitive/affective and biologic mechanisms by which yoga could have a positive impact on depression and anxiety. There is indeed preliminary evidence that yoga may be helpful for these problems, and there are several ongoing larger-scale randomized clinical trials. The current evidence base is strongest for yoga as efficacious in reducing symptoms of unipolar depression.

Author(s): 
Uebelacker, Lisa A.
Broughton, Monica K.
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

The pharmaceutical industry's wide range of interactions with physicians, trainees, and other medical professionals--interactions that include information transfer and financial incentives--has been the source of undue influences, especially on physicians' prescription behavior. Current literature has mainly been focused on the financial element of these influences, and the problems in medical professional-pharmaceutical industry interactions are mainly viewed in terms of conflicts of interest.

Author(s): 
Ahmadi Nasab Emran, Shahram
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: Reported cases of multiple personality disorder have increased dramatically in the last decade. Few data are available on the treatment of multiple personality disorder. Current recommendations are based on the experience of individual clinicians rather than on systematic research. METHOD: A questionnaire study of 305 clinicians representing a spectrum of mental health professionals was conducted to survey the types and relative efficacy of treatment modalities currently used with cases of multiple personality disorder.

Author(s): 
Putnam, F. W.
Loewenstein, R. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Prompted by the open letter by 13 prominent British scientists to National Health Science (NHS) trusts questioning the use of homeopathy, Vinjar Fønnebø, M.D., Ph.D., and Michael Baum, M.B., Ch.M., F.R.C.S., M.D.(Hon) entered into an e-mail exchange about the issues of research and documentation of practices in "complementary," "alternative," and "integrated" medicine. The paper presents the whole exchange unedited.

Author(s): 
Fønnebø, Vinjar
Baum, Michael
Publication Title: 
Klinische Monatsblatter Fur Augenheilkunde

In an overview new data from the literature regarding alternative/complementary medicine are presented. Naturopathy, acupuncture and homeopathy as well as new findings in placebo-research and their correlation to alternative medicine are discussed. In addition, as a synthesis a patient-orientated so-called anthropologic medicine is recommended to make alternative/complementary medicine unnecessary.

Author(s): 
Behrens-Baumann, W.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Medicine (London, England)

This paper describes the current status and evidence base for acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal and manipulative medicine, as well as the regulatory framework within which these therapies are provided. It also explores the present role of the Royal College of Physicians' Subcommittee on Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in relation to these developments.

Author(s): 
Lewith, George T.
Breen, Alan
Filshie, Jacqueline
Fisher, Peter
McIntyre, Michael
Mathie, Robert T.
Peters, David
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

The integration of complementary therapies within the British National Health Service (NHS) in the context of limited evidence of effectiveness has been much debated, as has the need for the provision of health services to be more evidence-based. In June 1994, a project was launched within a South-East London NHS Hospital Trust to introduce complementary therapy (acupuncture, homeopathy, and osteopathy), in the context of an evaluation program.

Author(s): 
Richardson, J.

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